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博物館 - MFA, The Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim Museum Presents Young Picasso in Paris 

Part of the Picasso Celebration 1973–2023, the exhibition will feature Le Moulin de la Galette. Exhibition: Young Picasso in Paris 
Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York 
Location: Tower Gallery 2 
Date: May 12–August 6, 2023
 
(NEW YORK, NY¾January 13, 2023) The Guggenheim Museum will present Young Picasso in Paris, an intimate exhibition comprising a total of ten paintings and works on paper executed during Pablo Picasso’s introduction to the French capital. Created over the course of one pivotal year, these works exemplify a period of stylistic experimentation and show his burgeoning mastery of character study. Picasso (b. 1881, Málaga, Spain; d. 1973, Mougins, France) arrived in Paris from Barcelona in autumn 1900, during the final weeks of the Universal Exhibition that included his own art in the Spanish pavilion. The ville lumière, or “city of lights,” captivated, and ultimately transformed, the nineteen-year-old Spaniard. He absorbed everything Paris had to offer over his initial two-month stay and during his return the following May through the end of 1901. Picasso patronized not only the art galleries, but also the bohemian cafés, raucous nightclubs, and sensational dance halls in the hilltop neighborhood of Montmartre. These sites of social gathering and the various types of people who frequented them quickly became a primary source of inspiration. Coinciding with the fiftieth anniversary of Picasso’s death, Young Picasso in Paris will highlight a defining work, Le Moulin de la Galette (ca. November 1900), from the Guggenheim collection. One of his first paintings executed in Paris, and sold by the artist shortly thereafter, Le Moulin de la Galette is also the subject of an extensive conservation analysis and treatment project that will be unveiled with the exhibition. The famous dance hall—formerly a mill engaged in the production of a brown bread, or galette—had also been depicted by such avant-gardists as Ramon Casas, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Vincent van Gogh. In his version, Picasso rendered a vibrant and expressionistic frieze of diverse patrons comingling under the dance hall’s electric lights. Among other notable features, Picasso’s painting represents the gender fluidity present in fin-de-siècle Paris, and also foreshadows the social disenfranchisement of the working classes that he brought into sharper focus with his subsequent Blue Period (1901–04). The tragic suicide in Paris of Picasso’s close friend, the painter and poet Carles Casagemas, in February 1901, undeniably impacted this year of artistic and personal evolution as well. All told, his time in Paris left a strong impression; Picasso would settle there in 1904. Young Picasso in Paris is organized by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance. Julie Barten, Senior Painting Conservator and Associate Director of Conservation Affairs, is leading the conservation research and treatment of Picasso’s Le Moulin de la Galette. This exhibition is part of the Picasso Celebration 1973–2023 program, organized with the support of the Musée national Picasso, Paris. About the Picasso Celebration 1973–2023 April 8, 2023, marks the fiftieth anniversary of the death of Spanish artist Pablo Picasso and thus the year will represent a celebration of his work and his artistic legacy in France, Spain, and internationally. The French and Spanish governments wished to mark this transnational event through a binational commission, bringing together the cultural and diplomatic administrations of both countries. The Picasso Celebration 1973–2023 revolves around some fifty exhibitions and events to be held at renowned cultural institutions in Europe and North America that, together, address a historiographical analysis of Picasso’s work. The commemoration, accompanied by official celebrations in France and Spain, will make it possible to take stock of the research and interpretations of the artist’s work, especially during an important international symposium in autumn 2023, which also coincides with the opening of the Center for Picasso Studies in Paris. The Musée national Picasso, Paris, and the Spanish national commission for the commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the death of Pablo Picasso are pleased to support this exceptional program. About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation was established in 1937 and is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of modern and contemporary art through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The international constellation of museums includes the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao; and the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. An architectural icon and “temple of spirit” where radical art and architecture meet, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is now among a group of eight Frank Lloyd Wright structures in the United States recently designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site. To learn more about the museum and the Guggenheim’s activities around the world, visit guggenheim.org

MFA Boston logoPublic Relations
MARCH 26–JULY 16, 2023
Hokusai: Inspiration and Influence
The Obama Portraits
Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji—Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. These unique juxtapositions demonstrate Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe—seen in works by, among others, his daughter Katsushika Ōi, his contemporaries Utagawa Hiroshige and Utagawa Kuniyoshi, and modern and contemporary artists including Loïs Mailou Jones, John Cederquist and Yoshitomo Nara.
Timed-entry exhibition tickets (general admission included) will go on sale February 8 at 10 am for MFA members and February 14 at 10 am for the general public. Member Preview will take place from March 22–25.
“Hokusai: Inspiration and Influence” is sponsored by UNIQLO USA. Generously supported by the MFA Associates / MFA Senior Associates. Additional support from the Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Exhibition Fund, the Museum Council Artist in Residency Program Fund, the Dr. Terry Satsuki Milhaupt Fund for Japanese Textiles, the MFA Associates / MFA Senior Associates Exhibition Endowment Fund, the Patricia B. Jacoby Exhibition Fund, and the Alexander M. Levine and Dr. Rosemarie D. Bria-Levine Exhibition Fund.

Works & Process Announces Spring 2023 Season

Programs at the Guggenheim, Lincoln Center, The New York Public Library for the Performing ArtsUnderground Uptown Dance Festival, held January 1217, in the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright-Designed TheaterOngoing LaunchPAD Residencies with 12 Partners in 7 NY Counties


“Directing attention and resources to dance communities often neglected by institutions of concert dance”
“An exceptional opportunity to understand something of the creative process”
— The New York Times

(NEW YORK, NY— December 8, 2022) Championing creative process from studio-to-stage, Works & Process continues to amplify support for performing artists and their artistic process. For spring 2023, Works & Process presents a robust series at the Guggenheim Museum, Lincoln Center, and The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, in partnership with the Jerome Robbins Dance Division. Programs provide audiences with unprecedented access to creative process, blending artist discussions and performance highlights, with the goal of fostering greater understanding and appreciation and broadening representation. 

Simultaneously, fostering cooperation, collectively with a network of twelve residency partners in seven New York counties, Works & Process LaunchPAD “Process as Destination” provides made-to-measure and sequenced residencies, supporting artists with living wage fees of $1,050 per artist, per week, transportation, health insurance enrollment, 24/7 studio access, and on-site housing. Recognizing that artistic process is a continuum, these residencies culminate in iterative performances and public programs that share the creative process with local communities and when ready in New York City. 

The season features some of the world’s largest performing arts organizations and simultaneously champions artists representing historically under-recognized performing arts cultures by providing rare longitudinal fully funded creative residencies, commissioning, and presenting support.  

In conjunction with the Guggenheim exhibition Nick Cave: Forothermore Works & Process will present The Reckoning by Francesca Harper, with music by Nona Hendryx, commissioned by ARRAY’s Law Enforcement Accountability Project (LEAP) and supported by and developed in Works & Process LaunchPAD. 

Commissions and Premieres

  • Existences, Krump project by Brian “HallowDreamz” Henry
  • The Reckoning by Francesca Harper, with music by Nona Hendryx

Highlights and Discussions

  • Underground Uptown Dance Festival – January 12-17 
  • Lyric Opera of Chicago: The Factotum by Will Liverman and DJ King Rico 
  • BalletCollective and PEAK Performances: The Night Falls by Karen Russell, Ellis Ludwig-Leone, and Troy Schumacher 
  • Vineyard Theatre and Second Stage Theater: White Girl in Danger by Michael R. Jackson 
  • Birthday Presence by Drag Queen and Tenor Jasmine Rice LaBeija at the Guggenheim and Lincoln Center 
  • The Metropolitan Opera: Champion by Terence Blanchard, libretto by Michael Cristofer 
  • Ballet West: Les Noces by Bronislava Nijinska 
  • Miami City Ballet: Square Dance by George Balanchine © The George Balanchine Trust 
  • New York City Ballet with Keerati Jinakunwiphat and Alysa Pires

 

General ticketing starts December 13 at worksandprocess.org.

Spring 2023 Season

Works & Process Underground Uptown Dance Festival

January 12-17
Peter B. Lewis Theater at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Tickets $45, $35, Choose-What-You-Pay 

In the subterranean Frank Lloyd Wright-designed theater at the Guggenheim, Works & Process presents a festival of commissioned street and social dances. Rare in the field of dance, let alone in the creators’ traditions, beyond presenting fee, all projects will have received longitudinal support. With some spanning four years, across multiple residencies Works & Process will have provided living wage fees, 24/7 devoted studio access, adjacent housing, access to health care insurance enrollment, performance fees, and iterative performance opportunities. 

Inspired by the circular architecture of the Guggenheim, the cyphers prevalent in street dance, and social environments where these performing art traditions were germinated, the works being presented weave audiences and artists together. These commissions endeavor to amplify the innate qualities of dance to physically connect and facilitate the embodiment of joy and community. 

Featuring Afrobeat, Ballroom, Beatbox, Body Percussion, Breaking, Choreopoem, Flexn, Hip-Hop, House, Improv, Krump, NYC Underground Club Culture, Percussive Dance, Samba, Street Jazz, Tap, Vogue, Waacking, and more! 

 

January 12 Highlights from Music From The Sole’s I Didn’t Come To Stay
Highlights from Ephrat Asherie Dance’s UNDERSCORED – Presented in collaboration with 92NY 

January 13 The Missing Element bringing together Beatbox, Breaking, Flexn, and Krumping 

January 14 Ladies of Hip Hop – The Black Dancing Bodies – Choreopoem SpeakMyMind 

January 15 Waacking with Princess Lockerooo
Highlights from Les Ballet Afrik’s New York Is Burning by Omari Wiles 

January 16 Existence, A Krump project by Brian “HallowDreamz” Henry – PREMIERE 

January 17 Mai Lê Hô’s LayeRhythm (On The Move) with Masterz at Work Dance Family led by Black Trans Femme choreographer Courtney Washington, Mother Balenciaga – Presented in collaboration with 92NY 

 

The Underground Uptown Dance Festival is presented on the occasion of the Association of Performing Arts Professionals conference with the intention of galvanizing touring support for featured works and providing all audiences with greater insight and access into the creative process.  

Tap, Percussive Dance, Samba, House, and NYC Club Culture 

Ephrat Asherie Dance and NYC Club Legends: Highlights from UNDERSCORED
Music From The Sole: Highlights from I Didn’t Come to Stay
Presented in collaboration with 92NY
Thursday, January 12, 7:30 pm

See two APAP ArtsForward and National Dance Project Grantees. 

A living archive of five generations of New York City club dancers, UNDERSCORED is a multi-faceted project rooted in the intergenerational stories and memories of NYC underground club heads. Commissioned by Works & Process and created by the dancers of Ephrat Asherie Dance and NYC club legends ranging in age from 27 to 79, UNDERSCORED is a collaboration that celebrates and explores the ever-changing physical and musical landscape of New York’s underground dance community. Building on the intergenerational transference of knowledge and culturally reflective movement that happens night after night on dance floors across the city, UNDERSCORED shares lived experiences, stories, and vibes from seminal parties, including David Mancuso’s the Loft, Larry Levan’s Paradise Garage and Timmy Regisford’s Shelter and the experiences of legends Archie Burnett, Michele Saunders, and Brahms “Bravo” LaFortune. 

Tap, percussive dance, samba, house, and live music come together in I Didn’t Come to Stay, commissioned by Works & Process and described by the New York Times as “An unforced crowd-pleaser, original and true to itself.” Brazilian tap dancer and choreographer Leonardo Sandoval and bassist and composer Gregory Richardson lead eight dancers and a five-piece band in a performance inspired by Carnival that explores tap’s lineage and connections to other Afrodiasporic forms. Together the pair embrace shared roots across the diaspora and reflect on racial and cultural identity, while also celebrating the joy, strength, depth, and virtuosity of Black dance and music. 

UNDERSCORED was commissioned by Works & Process and was developed in Works & Process LaunchPAD residencies at Catskill Mountain Foundation (2022), Bridge Street Theatre (2021), Kaatsbaan Cultural Park (2020), and the Guggenheim Museum. Additional residency support provided by CUNY Dance Initiative, LUMBERYARD, and The Yard. Past performances have taken place at Harlem Stage, Kaatsbaan Cultural Park, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, the Guggenheim Museum, The Jay and Linda Grunin Center for the Arts, and The Yard.  

I Didn’t Come to Stay was commissioned by Works & Process and was developed in Works & Process LaunchPAD residencies at Catskill Mountain Foundation (2022) and Kaatsbaan Cultural Park (2020), additional residency support provided by American Tap Dance Foundation, Chelsea Factory, Pillow Lab residency, and The Yard. Past performances have taken place at Jacob’s Pillow, the Guggenheim Museum, Guild Hall, Kaatsbaan Cultural Park, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, and New York City Center. 

 

Breaking, Flexn, Krump, and Beatbox

The Missing Element
Friday, January 13, 7:30 pm

Fusing together awe-inspiring street dancers from Krump, FlexN, and Breaking communities with the virtuosic music-making of the Beatbox House, The Missing Element is a culmination of what happens when performing art forms that traditionally compete collaborate.  

The Missing Element was commissioned by Works & Process and has been developed in Works & Process LaunchPAD residencies at Kaatsbaan Cultural Park (2020 and 2021). Past performances have taken place at the Guggenheim Museum, Guild Hall, Jacob’s Pillow Gala, Kaatsbaan Cultural Park, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Little Island, NY PopsUp with Amy Schumer, and very recently at the Guggenheim Bilbao’s 25th Anniversary.

 

In-Process Choreopoem

Ladies of Hip-Hop
The Black Dancing Bodies – SpeakMyMind
Saturday, January 14, 7:30 pm

“Each woman’s voice stands powerful on its own.”  The Dance Enthusiast

Part of an ongoing performance and documentary effort to represent Black women in street and club dance culture, this session highlights the form of the choreopoem, first coined in 1975 by writer Ntozake Shange (for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf). New writing, and music and dance of street, club and African culture come together in this in-process showing, led by Michele Byrd-McPhee, in which each member of the company responds to the question, “If I could speak my mind, what would I say?” 

SpeakMyMind is commissioned by Works & Process and has been developed in Works & Process LaunchPAD residencies at Bethany Arts Community (2022 and 2023), Catskill Mountain Foundation (2022), and Millay Arts (2022). Iterative performances have taken place at the Guggenheim Museum, Jacob’s Pillow, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, and New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. 

Afrobeat, House, Vogue, and Waacking 

Highlights from Les Ballet Afrik: New York Is Burning by Omari Wiles
Waacking with Princess Lockeroo
Sunday, January 15, 7:30 pm 

Underground, radical, Black and queer art rarely gets the recognition it deserves . . . until it’s appropriated and then popularized by mainstream culture. Vogue from the East Coast and waacking from the West Coast is no different. See today’s leading tradition bearers share the stage and honor their history. 

 

“Long overdue but well worth the wait.” — The New York Times 

Ballroom community legend and House of Oricci founding father Omari Wiles brings ball culture to the Guggenheim with New York Is Burning, featuring Wiles’s AfrikFusion, fusing traditional African dances and Afrobeat with house dance and vogue. The 1990 documentary Paris Is Burning received critical acclaim for its depiction of the New York drag ball scene and of voguing as a powerful expression of personal pride in the face of racism, homophobia, and the stigma of the AIDS crisis. Just as Paris Is Burning did for New York in the 1980s, New York Is Burning reflects the aspirations, desires, and yearnings of a diverse group of dancers in a city beset by health, racial, and financial crises. Commissioned by Works & Process prior to the pandemic as an homage to Paris Is Burning on the documentary’s 30th anniversary, Wiles’s work centers on the artists for whom his dance company serves as a surrogate family. 

 

“Princess Lockerooo is a whirling force with a singular focus: spreading the gospel of waacking.” — The New York Times 

Don’t miss a first look at this in-process Works & Process commission by Princess Lockeroo. In 1970s a dance form called waacking was born in the Black, gay underground clubs of Los Angeles. Tyrone Proctor, and friend, Billy Goodson risked their lives to perform such an effeminate, expressive dance, at a time when being openly gay subjected them to violence and prison. The dance was popularized on Soul Train and picked up by celebrities, then nearly became extinct with the AIDS crisis. Today, waacking has been re-born as a booming social media sensation and queer rights movement. In this new work, the “Queen of Waacking” honors her mentor, pioneering queer Black waacker and Soul Train legend, Tyrone Proctor who died in 2020, and carries on his legacy through the dance he championed his entire life. 

 

Wiles developed the Works & Process commission, New York Is Burning for his company, Les Ballet Afrik, in a summer 2020 Works & Process bubble residency at Kaatsbaan Cultural Park, a spring 2021 Works & Process bubble residency at Catskill Mountain Foundation, and a January 2022 Works & Process LaunchPAD “Process as Destination” residency at The Church, Sag Harbor in partnership with Guild Hall. Throughout this time, in some of New York State’s first permitted performances during the pandemic, Works & Process coproduced Les Ballet Afrik’s outdoor, filmed, and preview performances at Kaatsbaan Cultural Park, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, and the Guggenheim Museum rotunda and the world premiere in the Peter B. Lewis Theater. The company also performed previews at Jacob’s Pillow, New Victory Theater, and SummerStage. New York is Burning is a 2022 National Dance Project Finalists. 

Princess Lockerooo’s Works & Process commission is being developed in Works & Process LaunchPAD residencies at Bridge Street Theatre (2022), Watermill CenterThe Church, Sag Harbor (2023), and The Pocantico Center (2023). 

Krump

Existence by Brian “HallowDreamz” Henry – Premiere
Monday, January 16, 7:30 pm 

Created in the streets of south-central Los Angeles in the 1990s, Krump is a dance form. Inspired by “the creators” Mijo and Tight Eyezand the entire Krump movement because everyone has been an inspiration, Brian “HallowDreamz” Henry has been pushing the Krump movement in New York City since 2008. In this Works & Process commission, Henry in collaboration with 12 Krump dancers has created Existence. Come to Existence to learn what Krump is, experience shared community, and discover the vast reasons for its development and the layers of the culture. Though life does have its hardships and Krump is life, this is an invitation to see Krump drenched in positive intention, focusing on unity, freedom, empowerment, creativity, love, and joy. 

Existence was commissioned by Works & Progress and was developed in Works & Process LaunchPAD residencies at Bethany Arts Community (2022) and the Pocantico Center (2023).

Ballroom, Improv, Hip Hop, Street Jam, and Music Jam

LayeRhythm (On The Move) with Masterz at Work Dance Family
Presented in collaboration with 92NY
Tuesday, January 17, 7:30 pm 

“Imagine an improv comedy show where dancing, not laughs, is the currency. Then imagine a musicians’ jam session where the band is compelled to keep the dancers’ pace instead of the other way around. …what’s distinct about LayeRhythm is the way it bridges the two groups with crowd participation.” — The New York Times

Embodying the continuum of concert and social dance, LayeRhythm led by Mai Lê Hô weaves a singular mix of freestyle dance, live music, and audience interaction, celebrating the vibrancy of street and club dance cultures. Spotlighting Black trans femme choreographer Courtney Washington, Mother Balenciaga, founder of the Kiki House of Juicy Couture, a leader of the House of Balenciaga, and founder of Masterz at Work Dance Family, the evening will feature choreographed work from the Masterz, including ALL INCLUSIVE, alongside improvisations by musicians, dancers and emcees, captivating young and old, theater- and clubgoers. 

ALL INCLUSIVE was commissioned by Works & Process and was developed in Works & Process LaunchPAD residencies at Bethany Arts Community (2022 and 2023) and Kaatsbaan Cultural Center (2021). Past performances have taken place at the Guggenheim Museum, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, OTA Weekly, and with NY PopsUp in The Oculus and Coney Island. 

LayeRhythm has received Works & Process LaunchPAD residency support at The Church, Sag Harbor (2023). 

Works & Process at The Guggenheim

1071 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128
Tickets $45, $35, Choose-What-You-Pay 

Soul Opera

Lyric Opera of Chicago
The Factotum by Will Liverman and DJ King Rico, with Rajendra Ramoon Maharaj and Maleek Washington
Saturday, January 7, 7:30 pm 

Grammy-nominated baritone Will Liverman, an alumnus of Lyric Opera of Chicago’s Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Opera Center, and producer and multi-instrumentalist DJ King Rico create a new work inspired by Rossini’s The Barber of Seville, that has grown into an original piece all its own. Ahead of its February 3 world premiere at Chicago’s Harris Theater, go behind the scenes as musician Damien Sneed moderates a discussion with director Rajendra Ramoon Maharaj, choreographer Maleek Washington, Liverman and Rico, and cast members perform highlights. Learn about this joyful and original commission by Lyric Opera of Chicago, which is rooted in a Black barbershop on Chicago’s South Side. A soul opera, the work moves from gospel and funk to rap, hip-hop, barbershop quartet, and R&B, all with the operatic artform at its heart—in a very human comedy that redefines everything that opera can be. Don’t miss this irresistible upbeat work that celebrates the strength of community. 

Leadership for this Works & Process program is provided by the Allen R. and Judy Brick Freedman Venture Fund for New Opera. 

Dance, Music, and Writing

BalletCollective and PEAK Performances
The Night Falls by Karen Russell, Ellis Ludwig-Leone, and Troy Schumacher
Sunday, January 22, 7:30 pm 

In this new myth for the present, fractured era, people experiencing despair across the U.S. all have the same nightmare. A song will not leave their heads, luring lost souls to a kitschy Floridian roadside attraction. With choreography that dramatizes the body and music, surrender and resistance, The Night Falls shows the visceral power of art to brace us against the abyss. 

Prior to the show’s February 9 world premiere at Montclair State University, choreographer and director Troy Schumacher (New York City Ballet and BalletCollective), writer and lyricist Karen Russell (Swamplandia!), composer and lyricist Ellis Ludwig-Leone (San Fermin) discuss their creative process with moderator Michael Sean Breeden. Cast members perform highlights. 

Musical

Vineyard Theatre and Second Stage Theater
White Girl in Danger by Michael R. Jackson, with Raja Feather Kelly and Lileana Blain-Cruz
Sunday, February 26, 7:30 pm 

Ahead of its world premiere, go behind the scenes of this epic and viciously funny new musical by Michael R. Jackson, the Tony Award– and Pulitzer Prize–winning creator of A Strange Loop. In White Girl in Danger—a fever dream mashup of classic daytime and primetime soap operas, Lifetime movies, and red-hot melodrama—the citizens of the soap opera town Allwhite face high-stakes drama and intrigue all the days of their lives. Meanwhile Keesha Gibbs and the other Blackgrounds have been relegated to backburner stories of slavery and police violence for all of theirs. But Keesha is determined to step out of the Blackground and into the center of Allwhite’s juiciest stories. Can Keesha handle the Allwhite attention—especially from the Allwhite Killer on the loose? What role do the other Blackgrounds play in Keesha’s Allwhite schemes? And just whose story is this anyway? Find out as Jackson, choreographer Raja Feather Kelly, and director Lileana Blain-Cruz discuss the show and their creative process. Cast members perform highlights before the start of previews on March 14. 

Drag Cabaret

Birthday Presence by Jasmine Rice LaBeija
Wednesday, March 8, 7:30 pm 

The International Godmother of the Royal House of LaBeija—recently shouted out by Beyoncé in “Break My Soul (Queens Remix)”—summons her family uptown for a birthday kiki destined for legendary status. Drag artist Jasmine Rice LaBeija is a Juilliard-trained tenor possessed of a devastating wit, razor-sharp timing, and a commanding voice; all of which will be on full display in her new cabaret extravaganza premiering March 8 at Works & Process at the Guggenheim on the day of her father’s birth. Then on May 17, crossing town to Works & Process at Lincoln Center, the downtown darling hosts a homecoming celebration recital on the blessed day of her own birth, christening the newly opened David Geffen Hall’s sidewalk studio with unparalleled fabulousness. Your presence is expressly requested. 

Dance

ARRAY’s LEAP
The Reckoning by Francesca Harper, music by Nona Hendryx
Saturday, March 11, 7:30 pm

Existing as a film and a live performance, The Reckoning is choreographer and director Francesca Harper’s response to the 2010 killing of 11-year-old Aiyana Mo’Nay Stanley-Jones at the hands of Detroit law enforcement. In collaboration with composer Nona Hendryx, Harper creates an expressive historical record of injustice as she explores the relationship between erasure and commodification in the media’s coverage of brutality against bodies of color. Dancers from Ailey II and FHP Collective perform in costumes by Elias Gurrola, with lighting design by Itohan Edoloyi. 

The Reckoning was commissioned by ARRAY’s Law Enforcement Accountability Project (LEAP), a propulsive fund dedicated to empowering activists to disrupt the code of silence that exists around police aggression and misconduct.   

The development of The Reckoning and this live performance premiere is supported by Works & Process and developed in Works & Process LaunchPAD residencies at Bethany Arts Community with the collaboration of Gabri Christa and The Movement Lab @ Barnard.

Presented in conjunction with the Guggenheim exhibition Nick Cave: Forothermore. 

Opera

The Metropolitan Opera
Champion by Terence Blanchard, libretto by Michael Cristofer
Monday, March 20, 7:30 pm 

Experience highlights from six-time Grammy-winning composer Terence Blanchard’s haunting “opera in jazz.” Following their triumphant 2021 collaboration on Fire Shut Up in My Bones, Met Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin, director James Robinson, and choreographer Camille A. Brown reunite with Blanchard to explore the life of boxer Emile Griffith. Blanchard’s first opera, Champion tells the story of Griffith’s rise from obscurity to world champion, his struggle with his sexuality, and how a knockout of a homophobic rival in the early 1960s led to tragedy. Met General Manager Peter Gelb moderates a discussion with the creative team, and members of the cast perform selections from the opera. 

Dance

Ballet West
Les Noces by Bronislava Nijinska
Sunday, March 26, 3 pm and 7:30 pm 

Celebrate the 100th anniversary of Les Noces, or The Wedding, with choreography by Bronislava Nijinska and scenic and costume design by Nathalie Goncharova. A rarely performed, Sergei Diaghilev–era gem, the groundbreaking work, created in 1923 by a woman choreographer and woman designer, is set to a breathtaking and complex Stravinsky score. Ahead of the April 14 opening night in Salt Lake City, Ballet West Artistic Director Adam Sklute and Nijinksa scholar Lynn Garafolo participate in a discussion moderated by Linda Murray, Curator, Jerome Robbins Dance Division, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. Company dancers perform highlights. 

Ballet and Poetry

Miami City Ballet
Square Dance by George Balanchine © The George Balanchine Trust
Sunday and Monday, April 2 and 3, 7:30 pm 

“Two little ladies, up the track / sashay over, sashay back . . .” 
In an unprecedented return to the 1957 piece, this spring Miami City Ballet reimagines Balanchine’s Square Dance through a uniquely Miami lens. In the adaptation, a caller at a spicy backyard party brings back to the stage the high-spirited square-dance caller and his musician pals to keep things going. Explore a reimagining of Square Dance as Balanchine first conceived it. Before the May 12 opening night in Florida, members of the creative team participate in a discussion, and cast members perform excerpts. 

Leadership for this Works & Process program is provided by Charles and Deborah Adelman. 

Dance 

New York City Ballet
Keerati Jinakunwiphat and Alysa Pires
Sunday, April 23, 7:30 pm  

Go behind the scenes of two of New York City Ballet’s newest commissions. Choreographers Keerati Jinakunwiphat and Alysa Pires discuss their creative process, and company members perform excerpts. 

Works & Process at Lincoln Center

Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY 10023
Tickets $35, Choose-What-You-Pay, or Free 

In-Process Dance and Film

Caged Birds by Kash Gaines
Monday, April 24, 7:30 pm
Clark Studio Theater, Samuel B. and David Rose Building 

For many young New York City artists, the rambunctious tradition of Subway Showtime represents their best opportunity to show and improve in front of a live audience. The renegade act of public dance comes charged with the possibility of confrontation and arrest, risks that performer/documentarian Kash Gaines knows all too well. At this in-process sharing of Kash’s new project Caged Birds, commissioned by Works & Process for premiere at the Guggenheim, you’ll hear intimate stories of dancers’ perilous encounters with law enforcement inside and outside the MTA system and see the craft they’ve honed performing on the city’s biggest stage and interact with their future ambitions. Don’t miss this first look of both documentary film and live performances providing proof that these uncaged birds can truly fly. 

Caged Birds is supported with Works & Process LaunchPAD residencies at Bethany Arts Community (2023) and Bridge Street Theatre (2023). 

Drag Recital

Birthday Presence by Jasmine Rice LaBeija
Wednesday, May 17, 7:30 pm
Kenneth C. Griffin Sidewalk Studio, David Geffen Hall 

 The International Godmother of the Royal House of LaBeija—recently shouted out by Beyoncé in the “Break My Soul (Queens Remix)”—summons her family uptown for a birthday kiki destined for legendary status. Drag artist Jasmine Rice LaBeija is a Juilliard trained tenor possessed of a devastating wit, razor-sharp timing, and a commanding voice; all of which will be on full display in her new cabaret extravaganza premiering March 8 at Works & Process at the Guggenheim Museum. Crossing over to Lincoln Center, the downtown darling hosts a homecoming celebration recital on the blessed day of her birth, christening the newly opened David Geffen Hall’s sidewalk studio with unparalleled fabulousness. Your presence is expressly requested. 

Works & Process at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Jerome Robbins Dance Division

Café, 40 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY 10023
Tickets free, RSVP Required 

Krump with Brian “HallowDreamz” Henry
Wednesday, March 1, 7 pm 

One of the most sought after teachers and dancers of Krump a street style of dance, characterized by free, expressive, and exaggerated movements— Brian “HallowDreamz” Henry invites invites the community to join in the cypher to learn, practice, and session. Inspired by Krumpers Mijo and Tight Eyez “The Creators”, Henry will share his singular practice of the dance, and its specific expression and language.  A resident of Bed-Stuy, see his unique Krump style BROOKLYN BUCK, which he has been pushing in New York City since 2008, when he joined E.S.K. (East Street Kingdom), a branch of the group STREET KINGDOM founded by Tight Eyez. 

Waacking with Princess Lockerooo
Thursday, May 18, 7 pm

In the 1970s, a dance form called waacking was born in the Black, gay underground clubs of Los Angeles. Tyrone Proctor, and friend, Billy Goodson risked their lives to perform such an effeminate, expressive dance, when being openly gay subjected them to violence and prison. The dance was popularized on Soul Train and picked up by celebrities, then almost died out with the AIDS crisis. Preserving the legacy of waacking, recently Princess Lockerooo sat with Goodson to gather the legend’s oral history for the Jerome Robbins Dance Division. Don’t miss this chance to learn more about waacking’s history with the Queen of Waacking that also includes a lesson and performance. 

Kiki Ball
TBD

Works & Process Launchpad “Process as Destination” Residencies

Supporting longitudinal creative process and artist recovery, collectively with a network of 12 residency partners spanning seven New York counties, Works & Process LaunchPAD residencies provide sequenced and made-to-measure artist support, including living wage fees of $1,050 per artist per week, transportation, health insurance enrollment, 24/7 studio access, on-site housing, and culminate in public showings that illuminate the creative process with local communities. 

Bethany Arts Community, Osinning, NY
Ladies of Hip-Hop
The Black Dancing Bodies Project
SpeakMyMind
Jan 4–11, 2023 

Caged Birds by Kash Gaines
Mar 1–9, 2023 

The Reckoning by Francesca Harper
Mar 5–9, 2023 

Raja Feather Kelly and the feath3r
theory (TF3T)
Jun 9–17, 2023 

Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill, NY
Caged Birds by Kash Gaines
Jan 30–Feb 11, 2023 

Catskill Mountain Foundation, Hunter, NY
The Missing Element
Jan 14–21, 2023 

History of Beatbox
Apr 11–16, 2023 

Chroma with Adrian Danchig-Waring and Joseph Gordon
July 3–9, 2023 

The Church, Sag Harbor, NY
LayeRhythm
Jan 2-16, 2023

Guild Hall William P. Rayner Artists-in-Residence
Chroma with Adrian Danchig-Waring and Joseph Gordon
Jun 23–July 2, 2023 

Millay Arts, Austerlitz, NY 
Ladies of Hip-Hop
The Black Dancing Bodies Project
SpeakMyMind
Dec 19–24, 2022 

NYU Center for Ballet and the Arts, New York, NY
Chroma with Adrian Danchig-Waring and Joseph Gordon
Dec 6–21, 2022 with Lar Lubovitch
Feb 28–Mar 5, 2023 with Pam Tanowitz 

The Pocantico Center, Tarrytown, NY
Existence by Brian “HallowDreamz” Henry
Jan 9–15, 2023 

Waacking with Princess Lockerooo
Mar 13–19, 2023 

Watermill Center, Water Mill, NY
Waacking with Princess Lockerooo
Jan 3–13, 2023 

Additional Partners:

Chautauqua Institution, Chautauqua, NY
Modern Accord Depot, Accord, NY
Petronio Residency Center, Round Top, NY  

Works & Process Lead Donors

APAP ArtsForwardJody and John ArnholdStuart H. Coleman and Meryl RosofskyLucy and Phil DobrinThe Fanwood FoundationFirst Republic BankAdam FlattoFord FoundationBart Friedman and Wendy SteinChristian Humann FoundationLeon Levy FoundationMertz Gilmore FoundationNew England Foundation for the ArtsNYC Department of Cultural AffairsNew York State Council on the ArtsRobert PollockStephen Kroll ReidyRockefeller Brothers FundThe Evelyn Sharp FoundationRandall SharpBarbara Slifka, and Denise Littlefield Sobel.

About Works & Process

Championing the creative process from studio-to-stage, Works & Process, is an independent performing arts organization that supports artists from both the world’s largest organizations and from underrecognized performing arts cultures by providing rare, sequenced and fully-funded creative residency, commissioning, and iterative presenting support. 

Blending artist discussions and performance highlights, each program provides unprecedented behind the scenes access to support our goal of broadening representation and fostering greater understanding and appreciation of the performing arts.  

Works & Process celebrates New York artists and street and social dance with programs at the Guggenheim Museum, Lincoln Center, and The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, with the Jerome Robbins Dance Division. LaunchPAD “Process as Destination” partnerships with 12 residency centers across New York State amplify our support for artistic process. 

“But praise and gratitude also must go to Works & Process and Jacob’s Pillow. These organizations have not only been providing lifelines to artists during the pandemic, they have also been directing attention and resources to dance communities often neglected by the institutions of concert dance.” 
— The New York Times 

Stay connected, @worksandprocess


The Guggenheim Museum Presents Sarah Sze: Timelapse, Opening March 31, 2023
 Sze’s site-specific installations will transform the iconic Guggenheim architecture into a tool for timekeeping and a meditation on the multitude of ways that we mark and experience the passage of time. Exhibition: Sarah Sze: Timelapse Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York Location: Rotunda Level 6, Tower Level 7, Museum Exterior Date: March 31–September 12, 2023 (NEW YORK, NY—December 1, 2022) The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum will present a solo exhibition of Sarah Sze (b. 1969, Boston) featuring a series of site-specific installations by the acclaimed New York–based artist. Sarah Sze: Timelapse will unravel a trail of discovery through multiple spaces of the iconic Frank Lloyd Wright building, from the exterior of the museum to the sixth level of the rotunda and the adjacent tower level gallery. The exhibition will explore Sze’s ongoing reflection on how our experience of time and place is continuously reshaped in relationship to the constant stream of objects, images, and information in today’s digitally and materially saturated world. Sze creates across multiple mediums employing painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, video, and installation. She is well known for her intricate constructions using a myriad of both fabricated and found objects and images. Whether an intimately scaled sculpture or a large, permanent public commission, her works possess a generative quality—as though in a cycle of growth and decay—and dynamically engage with the spaces they occupy. Visitors and passersby will first encounter Sarah Sze: Timelapse outside the museum where the presentation spills into the public sphere. At street level an uninterrupted flow of images will trace the contours of the building’s exterior, while a projection on the rotunda’s circular facade will mirror in real time the cycle of the moon over the course of the exhibition. In Sze’s reimagination, the Guggenheim’s iconic, UNESCO World Heritage architecture becomes a public timekeeper in a reminder that timelines are built through shared experience and memory. In the words of the artist, “Like the collective efforts used by humans over centuries to communally mark time, to measure and mark it in physical form—ranging from Jantar Mantar, to the Prime Meridian line, to ubiquitous minarets, clock towers, and animated or astronomical clocks around the world—the museum building will become a site to explore the idea of a public clock, and an experiment in collective timekeeping that all in the city can experience.” Inside the museum, quiet gestures, such as a single pendulum hovering above the fountain on the rotunda floor and a small sculptural installation tucked into an interstitial space in front of the freight elevator, demonstrate Sze’s distinct engagement with unexpected spaces. As visitors ascend to the sixth, uppermost level of the rotunda, they will enter an immersive environment: a panoramic sequence of eight bays occupied by a new series of works comprising painting, sculpture, video, drawing, and sound. These will be connected by a river of videos—seen earlier on the building’s street-level facade— which slowly travels up the spiral expanse of the building’s interior, creating a horizon line of moving images. As it travels across, above, and behind the works on view, visitors will be absorbed into a generative experience, continually re-orienting themselves temporally and spatially. Bookending the new installation on Rotunda Level 6 will be two key works from the Guggenheim’s collection, both on view for the first time in New York. The installation will begin with Sze’s first artwork to incorporate video, Untitled (Media Lab, Casino Luxembourg) (1998), which captures her signature ability to fuse found objects and video. The exhibition will continue into Tower Level 7, culminating in the artist’s monumental work Timekeeper (2016). Timekeeper is a multisensory, multimedia installation that has at its center an artist’s desk filled with quotidian objects. An overflow of still and moving images are projected in cascades from the desk onto the surrounding walls: a bird in flight, fire burning in a trash can, a child sleeping, a hand drawing a line, static noise on a screen. Digital clocks indicating the actual time from different zones around the world are also embedded within, underscoring how the ubiquitous nature of technology has reframed our understanding of time and place. Time, as it is shown unfolding in the ensemble of works gathered for this exhibition, is a collection of lived and remembered experiences. Sarah Sze: Timelapse is, as Sze puts it, “a contemplation on how we mark time and how time marks us.” The exhibition will be accompanied by a special, 152-page publication with contributions by curator Kyung An and writers Hilton Als and Molly Nesbit. Conceived in close collaboration with the artist’s studio and designed by Neil Donnelly, it will include installation views from the exhibition, a testament to Sze’s singular approach to materials and space. Sarah Sze: Timelapse is organized by Kyung An, Associate Curator, Asian Art. Funders Major support for Sarah Sze: Timelapse is provided by Gagosian. The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its generosity, with special thanks to the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation, Barbara and Andrew Gundlach, Victoria Miro, Charlotte Feng Ford, The Peter Norton Family Foundation, Janet Benton, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, Angelo K H Chan and Frederick Wertheim, Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg, Katherine Farley and Jerry I. Speyer, Joanne Gold and Andrew Stern, Agnes Gund, Takeo Obayashi, Laurie M. Tisch, Barbara Toll, James Keith Brown and Eric Diefenbach, Miyoung Lee and Neil Simpkins, and those who wish to remain anonymous. Support is also generously provided by the Girlfriend Fund, the Robert Lehman Foundation, and the Sidney E. Frank Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s International Director’s Council and Photography Council. About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation was established in 1937 and is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of modern and contemporary art through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The international constellation of museums includes the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao; and the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. An architectural icon and “temple of spirit” where radical art and architecture meet, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is now among a group of eight Frank Lloyd Wright structures in the United States recently designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site. To learn more about the museum and the Guggenheim’s activities around the world, visit guggenheim.org.


Gail and Alfred Engelberg Commit $15 Million to Support Guggenheim Museum Education Programs


Education facilities to be named Gail May Engelberg Center for Arts Education and a formal dedication and naming ceremony will take place November 1, 2022.

(NEW YORK, NY—July 20, 2022) The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum announces that Gail and Alfred Engelberg and the Engelberg Foundation have committed $15 million to endow the museum’s arts education programs.

Gail May Engelberg is a member of the Guggenheim’s Board of Trustees and the Chair of the Education Committee of the Guggenheim Foundation. She has been a major supporter and advocate for arts education at the Guggenheim for a quarter of a century and previously endowed the position of Deputy Director of Education.

In recognition of this new gift, the Guggenheim Museum’s education space will be named the Gail May Engelberg Center for Arts Education. The 8,200-square-foot center includes classrooms, studio art spaces, and a theater and furthers the Guggenheim’s mission of offering learning opportunities for community members, museum visitors, and students to build engagement with and connection to the arts and each other.

Richard Armstrong, Director, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, commented, “We are honored that the Guggenheim’s education center will bear the name of Gail May Engelberg, who has been one of the most ardent leaders of arts education at the Guggenheim for the last 25 years. Gail’s support and advocacy are truly exemplary and have enabled the Guggenheim to create dynamic and meaningful programming.”

“My parents taught me the importance of the arts and arts education when I was a young girl and brought me to New York to visit the Guggenheim,” Engelberg said. “The arts have been an essential part of my life ever since. It is an honor to support the work of this great museum in providing educational opportunities that I know will enrich the lives of children, students, and families for generations to come.”

About the Guggenheim’s Education and Public Programs

The Guggenheim’s programs offer learners opportunities to have lifelong relationships with art, museums, and their own creative potential. Through collaboration with artists, scholars, and cultural leaders, the education center creates innovative and inclusive learning opportunities for diverse museum visitors across all age groups. The Guggenheim is dedicated to providing a space for exchange, creative thinking, and co-creation.

School, Youth, and Family programs include educator workshops, Gugg Teens, free visits for all NYC public schools, as well as Learning Through Art, an artist-in-residency school partnership that has served over 150,000 students in all New York City boroughs since 1970.

Academic Engagement initiatives bring a diverse and international cohort of undergraduate and graduate students and faculty together. Two paid programs, including the Internship Program and the Summer College Workshop, and academic partnerships with leading institutions such as New York University, the City University of New York, Rutgers University, and Columbia University provide experiential learning, encourage student experimentation, and support curricular goals.

Public Programs and Engagement encompass endowed lectures, conversation series, performances and commissions, yearlong residencies, architecture-focused programs, and dynamic virtual offerings, all of which promote exchange with artists, thought leaders, and visionaries. The inaugural Poet-in-Residence program was launched in 2021 in a collaborative partnership with the Academy of American Poets.

Interpretation and Access programs include ongoing initiatives such as Mind’s Eye for participants who are blind or have low vision, as well as partnerships with organizations to provide individualized group tours and ASL interpreters for public programs. The new interactive poetry space in the Aye Simon Reading Room has served over 50,000 visitors since it opened in late 2021.

About Gail May Engelberg

In addition to her service at the Guggenheim, Gail May Engelberg is Vice Chair of the Board of Jazz at Lincoln Center, where she has also been a leader in education, and a trustee of The Engelberg Foundation, a family foundation that provides grants for healthcare, education, and social service projects. She has also served on the Board of New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts and as Secretary of the Board of the Aspen Music Festival and School. Engelberg received her BA in fine arts from Colorado Women’s College, Denver, and cofounded Gammel, Ollendick & May (1974–85), a firm specializing in the purchase and removal of abandoned railroad lines and the recycling of railroad ties, rail, and scrap steel throughout the western United States. Engelberg is a native of New Orleans; she and her husband, Alfred Engelberg, a retired intellectual property lawyer, reside in Palm Beach, Florida.

About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation was established in 1937 and is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of modern and contemporary art through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The international constellation of museums includes the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao; and the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. An architectural icon and “temple of spirit” where radical art and architecture meet, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is now among a group of eight Frank Lloyd Wright structures in the United States recently designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site. To learn more about the museum and the Guggenheim’s activities around the world, visit guggenheim.org.

Visitor Information

Admission: Adults $25, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. Open Sunday, Monday, and Wednesday through Friday, 11 am to 6 pm, and Saturday, 11 am to 8 pm. Closed Tuesday. Members-only on select Mondays, 6 pm to 8 pm. Pay What You Wish hours are Saturdays, 6 pm to 8 pm. Purchase of timed tickets is encouraged ahead of visit. Explore the Guggenheim with our free Digital Guide, a part of the Bloomberg Connects app. Find it in the Apple App Store or in the Google Play Store.

The Guggenheim Museum has taken COVID-19 safety measures to reduce the risk of exposure to visitors and staff. Masks are required regardless of vaccination status.

 

For additional information

Sara Fox
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation
212 423 3840
pressoffice@guggenheim.org

    (Boston Orange 編譯) 位於紐約市的古根漢博物館 (Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum) (20) 日宣佈,Gail Alfred Engelberg夫婦和Engelberg基金會承諾捐款1500萬元資助該館的藝術教育項目。

Gail May Engelberg 是古根漢博物館董事會董事,也是古根漢基金教育委員會主席。過去25年來,她一直是古根漢博物館藝術教育的主要支持者,早前還資助設立教育副主任職位。

為誌記這一新捐贈,古根漢博物館佔地8200平方呎的教育空間將命名為「Gail May Engelberg藝術教育中心」。該中心內有較是,藝術工作室,以及劇院,還有可以進一步實現古根漢博物館為社區人士,博物館訪客,以及學生提供學習,參與,還有和彼此及藝術建立聯繫的機會。

古根漢博物館及基金主任Richard Armstrong表示,「我們很榮幸,古根漢教育中心將帶有Gail May Engelberg的名字。過去25年來,她是古根漢藝術教育的最前衛領導,她的支持及擁護真的是模範,使得古根漢能更創造更活潑極有意義的項目。

Gail May Engelberg說,「在我還是個年輕女孩時,我父母教我藝術及藝術教育的重要性,把我帶到紐約參觀古根漢。藝術從此成為我生命中的基本元素。我很榮幸能在提供教育機會上支持這偉大博物館的工作,我知道那將會豐富未來世代兒童、學生及家庭的生活。

Guggenheim Museum Presents “Eva Hesse: Expanded Expansion”

A Powerful Work by Eva Hesse Is on Public Display for the First Time in 35 Years after a Complex and Dedicated Process of Restoration

Exhibition: Eva Hesse: Expanded Expansion
Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location: Tower Level 5
Dates: July 8–October 16, 2022

(NEW YORK, NY—June 9, 2022) A focused exhibition devoted to influential and experimental artist Eva Hesse (b. 1936, Hamburg, Germany; d. 1970, New York) is on view July 8 through October 16 at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Eva Hesse: Expanded Expansion is both an examination of the artist’s studio practice and an invitation to explore the transformation and afterlife of a restored monumental work, displayed publicly for the first time in 35 years.

In the late 1960s, Eva Hesse sought to make objects that were neither painting nor sculpture, but a hybrid that was all her own. Simultaneously adopting and pushing against the prevailing Minimalist language of repetitive forms and hard edges, her work is imbued with a haptic experience that reflects her keen interest in materiality and incongruity. To create Expanded Expansion (1969), the show’s central piece, the artist painted pliable layers of natural latex rubber onto cheesecloth panels, and supported them on rigid fiberglass and polyester resin poles, resulting in a massive scrim that expands or contracts to fit its environment. At once commanding and humorous, the towering structure leans against the wall, balanced on a series of awkward “legs”. A short Guggenheim-produced documentary chronicles the piece’s restoration from its status as “unexhibitable,” detailing the museum’s vast research, dialogue, and meticulous conservation processes.

Accompanying Expanded Expansion is a selection of smaller experimental works that reveal Hesse’s skillful hand and visceral manipulation of materials. Visitors are also given a rare look into the artist’s working and living space through unedited footage captured on film by Dorothy Beskind, and in an interview with Hesse by art historian and activist Cindy Nemser—uncovering the artist’s ideas about the connections between her life and her art:

“I remember always working with contradictions and contradictory forms, which is my idea also in life, the whole absurdity of life, everything for me has always been opposites, nothing has ever been in the middle. . . . it was always more interesting than making something average, normal, right-size.”

— Eva Hesse

The show surveys the temporalities of exhibition and interpretation, elucidating the contextual nature of perception and the complexities around preservation and stewardship. Hesse was well aware of the fragility of her chosen media, yet ambivalent about their accelerated demise over time, leaving the museum with a lasting question regarding her feelings about Expanded Expansion’s physical changesDespite its shifts in color and increasing rigidity, the piece still holds tremendous power as a testament to the pioneering artist who, despite her untimely death in 1970, left a body of work that pushed sculpture beyond Minimalism and Abstract Expressionism, and continues to deeply influence and inspire artists today.

Eva Hesse: Expanded Expansion is curated by Lena Stringari, Deputy Director and Andrew W. Mellon Chief Conservator, with the collaboration of Richard Armstrong, Director, and Esther Chao, Objects Conservator.

Guggenheim Museum Presents “Gillian Wearing: Wearing Masks”

First North American Retrospective of Gillian Wearing Features Photography, Video, Sculpture, and Paintings That Explore Performative Nature of Identity is Extended

Exhibition: Gillian Wearing: Wearing Masks
Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location: Tower Levels 2, 4, 5, 7 and New Media Theater through April 4, and Tower Levels 2, 4 and 7 from April 16 to June 13
Dates: November 5, 2021–June 13, 2022
The exhibition will be closed to the public from April 6 to April 15

(NEW YORK, NY—March 11, 2021)—From November 5, 2021 through June 13, 2022, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Gillian Wearing: Wearing Masks, the first retrospective of Wearing’s work in North America. Featuring more than a hundred pieces, the exhibition traces the development of the British conceptual artist’s practice from her earliest photographs and videos to her latest paintings and sculptures, all of which explore the performative nature of identity.

Gillian Wearing: Wearing Masks is organized by Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography, and Nat Trotman, Curator, Performance and Media, with X Zhu-Nowell, Assistant Curator, and Ksenia Soboleva, Marica and Jan Vilcek Curatorial Fellow.

Gillian Wearing’s profoundly empathetic and psychologically intense photographs, videos, sculptures, and paintings probe the tensions between self and society in an increasingly media-saturated world. Over her three-decade career, Wearing has focused equally on her own self-portraiture and on the depictions of others, testing the boundaries between the private and public, questioning fixed notions of identity, and frequently anticipating the cultural transformations wrought by social media. Throughout her works, masks serve as both literal props and metaphors for the performances each of us stage every day as individuals and as citizens.

For her landmark piece Signs that say what you want them to say and not Signs that say what someone else wants you to say (1992–93), Wearing photographed strangers holding placards with messages they wrote themselves. In so doing, she changed the terms of documentary street photography and performance art by giving voice to the subjects of her images. This series established Wearing’s long-standing practice of engaging the public through classified ads, casting calls, or direct solicitation on the street in order to create platforms where people’s often very personal stories could be shared with a wider audience.

Wearing has also repeatedly turned the camera on herself to examine the ways one’s sense of self is established within familial, social, and historical contexts, especially in the aftermath of traumatic experience. Through her extensive interrogation of the self-portrait, she has pointedly expanded on Andy Warhol’s notion that “everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes,” predicting the rise of selfie culture. In addition to performing versions of herself, she has engaged with images of people who are closely connected to her identity as a person and as an artist. In her photographic series Spiritual Family (2008–present), for instance, she employs silicon prosthetics, wigs, and lighting to disguise herself as pivotal figures from art history who have been foundational influences on her practice.

Wearing has long been fascinated by the ways film and television can conjure worlds that, while completely fabricated, still carry real emotional weight. Since 1996 she has cast professional actors in her videos in addition to working with nonactors. Her interest in the methods and effects of dramatic acting extend naturally from her examinations into the everyday performance of public life. On stage, emotional authenticity can be scripted and rehearsed, and actors often redirect personal experiences to express a character’s truth. At the same time, victims of trauma sometimes recount their stories as though reading a script. This paradoxical relationship between acted and actual reality underlies many of Wearing’s works, including her video We Are Here (2014). Wearing set this film in the West Midlands of England, where she grew up, working in locations that were of personal significance to her and with local residents, who are cast as ghosts and deliver haunting monologues recounting their regrets, losses, and guilt. We Are Here screens through April 2, on Saturdays continuously from 12 to 5 pm in the museum’s New Media Theater.

In recent years Wearing has incorporated digital technologies into her photography and video while also extending her practice to the mediums of painting, collage, and sculpture. Wearing, Gillian (2018), a short video produced in collaboration with the global advertising agency Wieden + Kennedy, revolves around an apparently candid statement of artistic purpose, delivered by actors whose faces have been digitally morphed with Wearing’s. Lockdown (2020), a series of paintings made in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and My Charms (2021), a sculptural self-portrait in the form of a gigantic charm bracelet, expand on Wearing’s enduring investigation into the complex tensions between authentic self-revelation and deception. These new pieces will make their museum debut at the Guggenheim.

Installed throughout all four of the museum’s Tower galleries and including screenings of Wearing’s work in the New Media Theater, Gillian Wearing: Wearing Masks is accompanied by a richly illustrated, 192-page monograph that will survey the artist’s three-decade career with a particular focus on her work of the last ten years. The exhibition will also coincide with a new sculptural tribute to photographer Diane Arbus by Wearing on view October 20, 2021 through August 14, 2022 at Doris C. Freedman Plaza, Central Park, organized by Public Art Fund.

Program

Thursday, April 21, 6:30–8 pm
Wearing Masks: The Performance of Identity in Contemporary Art

Using masks as both props and metaphors, Gillian Wearing’s photographs, videos, and installations explore the performance of identity, an act that we all participate in on a quotidian basis as a means to various ends. As RuPaul famously stated, “We’re all born naked, and the rest is drag.” Some of us adopt specific affects, mannerisms, or styles of dress to authentically signal to the outside world how we feel within. For others, assimilation is a vital act of self-preservation. Often the identities we present will shift to accommodate the social or physical spaces that we occupy. More nefariously, as with the infamous Anna Delvey, and “Tinder Swindler” Simon Leviev, the performance can be a manipulative con, “faking it until you make it.” In our present landscape saturated by social media, everyone has the opportunity to present themselves as a finely curated brand.

On the occasion of the exhibition Gillian Wearing: Wearing Masks, the Guggenheim will gather a virtual panel of artists to discuss how they each explore the central theme of identity performance within their creative practices. Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography, will provide an introductory presentation contextualizing the conversation within Wearing’s practice. The panelists will include Farah Al Qasimi, Malik Gaines, and Colette Lumiere. The program is organized and moderated by Dr. Ksenia M. Soboleva, Andrew W. Mellon Gender and LGBTQ+ History Fellow at the Center for Women’s History, New-York Historical Society Museum and Library.

This virtual program will be livestreamed for free on the Guggenheim’s website and YouTube channel. Register for a tune-in reminder.

Funders

Major support for Gillian Wearing: Wearing Masks is provided by the Edlis-Neeson Foundation, Alessandra and Alan Mnuchin, Ted Pappendick and Erica Gervais, Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein, Naomi Milgrom, and Maureen Paley. Additional support is provided by Zabludowicz Collection in collaboration with Tamares Real Estate Holdings Inc., Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, Angelo K H Chan and Frederick Wertheim, Joseph M. Cohen Family Collection, Ann Cook and Charles Moss, Nion McEvoy and Leslie Berriman, Lauren and Scott Pinkus, Regen Projects, John L. Thomson, Cristina von Bargen and Jonathan McHardy, Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker, and Ann and Mel Schaffer.

Funding is also generously provided by the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation.

Support is also provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Additional funding is provided by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s Photography Council.

About the Artist

Gillian Wearing (b. 1963, Birmingham, U.K.) graduated from Goldsmiths College in 1990 and was awarded the Turner Prize in 1997. Solo exhibitions of her work have been organized by Le Consortium, Dijon, France (1996); Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva (1998); Serpentine Gallery, London (2000); Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (2001); Sala de Exposiciones de la Fundación “la Caixa,” Madrid (2001); Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2002); Galleria Civica de Arte Contemporanea, Trento, Italy (2007); Whitechapel Gallery, London (2012); and IVAM, Valencia (2015); among many others. Recent exhibitions include Gillian Wearing and Claude Cahun at the National Portrait Gallery, London (2017); Gillian Wearing: Family Stories at SMK, Copenhagen (2017); and Life: Gillian Wearing at the Cincinnati Art Museum (2018). In 2018 the Mayor of London commissioned Wearing to create a public monument to Dame Millicent Fawcett, the first sculpture depicting a woman and the first created by a woman in London’s Parliament Square. Wearing lives and works in London.

About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation was established in 1937 and is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of modern and contemporary art through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The international constellation of museums includes the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao; and the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. An architectural icon and “temple of spirit” where radical art and architecture meet, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is now among a group of eight Frank Lloyd Wright structures in the United States recently designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site. To learn more about the museum and the Guggenheim’s activities around the world, visit guggenheim.org.

Visitor Information

Admission: Adults $25, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. Open Thursdays through Mondays from 11 am to 6 pm. Pay What You Wish hours are Saturdays from 4 to 6 pm, with free admission on Saturday on the House, offered once each month. Timed tickets are required and available at guggenheim.org/tickets. Explore the Guggenheim with our free Digital Guide, a part of the Bloomberg Connects app. Find it in the Apple App Store or in the Google Play Store.

The Guggenheim is implementing health and safety measures in consideration of visitors and employees and in compliance with New York State and City guidelines. Face masks are mandatory inside the museum for anyone over the age of two. New requirements should be reviewed in advance of a visit; they are posted on COVID-19 Safety Measures: What to Expect When Visiting.


GUGGENHEIM

Guggenheim Presents Wu Tsang: Anthem, Opening July 23

A New Film Installation Commissioned by the Guggenheim and Conceived by Wu Tsang in Collaboration with the Legendary Musician Beverly Glenn-Copeland



Exhibition: Wu Tsang: Anthem
Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location: Rotunda
Dates: July 23–September 6, 2021

(NEW YORK, NY – July 15, 2021)—From July 23 through September 6, 2021, Wu Tsang: Anthem will be on view at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. It is the final project in Re/Projections: Video, Film, and Performance for the Rotunda, a series of four distinct presentations that reimagine the Guggenheim’s rotunda as a space for navigating tensions between collective and individual experience.

Wu Tsang: Anthem is organized by X Zhu-Nowell, Assistant Curator. The exhibition text is written by X Zhu-Nowell, in collaboration with musicologist Frederick Cruz Nowell.

A new work by artist Wu Tsang commissioned by the Guggenheim Museum, Anthem (2021), was conceived in collaboration with the legendary singer, composer, and transgender activist Beverly Glenn-Copeland and harnesses the Guggenheim’s cathedral-like acoustics to construct what the artist calls a “sonic sculptural space.” This site-specific installation revolves around an immense, eighty-four-foot curtain sculpture suspended from the oculus. Projected onto this luminous textile is a “film-portrait” Tsang created of Glenn-Copeland improvising and singing passages of his music, including original a cappella melodies and his rendition of the spiritual “Deep River.” Conjuring an alluring and reverberant aura, Anthem weaves Glenn-Copeland’s music into a larger tapestry of other voices and sounds placed throughout the museum’s circular ramp, building a soundscape that wraps around the space. Working in collaboration with the musician Kelsey Lu and the DJ, producer, and composer Asma Maroof, Tsang developed this arrangement of sounds as a series of improvisatory responses inspired by the call of Glenn-Copeland’s voice. Visitors are encouraged to traverse upward from the bottom of the museum to the top of the building, and vice versa, and explore how Anthem ascends and descends along the spiral path.

The title of this exhibition, Anthem, draws from lesser-known histories of the word, which then meant antiphon, a style of call-and-response singing associated with music as a spiritual practice. Unlike a conventional anthem, which amplifies the power of a song through loudness and uniform sound, this installation enhances the call of Glenn-Copeland’s voice by combining it with ambiguous vocal timbres, changing tints of ambient sound, and other heterogeneous sonic and visual textures. Within this lush yet complicated auditory environment, Tsang’s Anthem also cultivates moments of quiet, rest, and reflection, reimagining the rotunda as a compassionate atmosphere for collective listening and looking.

Wu Tsang: Anthem is part of Re/Projections: Video, Film, and Performance for the Rotunda, a 2021 series comprising In Between Days: Video from the Guggenheim Collections (March 19 to April 19), organized by Nat Trotman, Curator, Performance and Media; Christian Nyampeta: Sometimes It Was Beautiful (April 30 to June 21), organized by Xiaoyu Weng, former Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator; and Ragnar Kjartansson: Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy (July 2 to July 5) organized by Nat Trotman, with Terra Warren, Curatorial Assistant, which was originally commissioned by C Project and curated by Tom Eccles, and premiered at the Women’s Building, San Francisco, in 2018.

Each of these four varied presentations draws on the building’s unique capacity for distanced gathering to create frameworks for dialogue and mutual care. The experimental approach behind Re/Projections is designed to privilege multiple voices while remaining nimble in a moment of economic and public health crises. With its focus on video, film, and performance, the series also celebrates acts of embodiment, storytelling, and interpersonal connection.

Funders

Major support for Wu Tsang: Anthem has been provided by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation; Thomas and Lynn Ou; and Susy and Jack Wadsworth. Additional support has been provided by Patrick Sun. Additional funding is provided by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s Asian Art Circle. Exhibition production has been generously supported by Kvadrat and Erik Bruce. Loudspeakers have been generously provided by Fleetwood Sound.

About Wu Tsang

Wu Tsang (b. 1982, Worcester, Mass.) has presented at museums and film festivals internationally, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Tate Modern, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Kunsthalle Münster; Gropius Bau, Berlin; Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art; Kuandu Museum of Fine Arts, Taipei; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art and Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Nottingham Contemporary; Berlinale Film Festival, Berlin; SANFIC, Santiago; Hot Docs Festival, Toronto; and South by Southwest Film Festival, Austin. She has received grants from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller Foundations, and was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship. She is currently an artistic director in residence at the Schauspielhaus, Zurich.

About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation was established in 1937 and is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of modern and contemporary art through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The international constellation of museums includes the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao; and the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. An architectural icon and “temple of spirit” where radical art and architecture meet, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is now among a group of eight Frank Lloyd Wright structures in the United States recently designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site. To learn more about the museum and the Guggenheim’s activities around the world, visit guggenheim.org.

Visitor Information

Admission: Adults $25, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. Open Thursdays through Mondays from 11 am to 6 pm. Pay What You Wish hours are Saturdays from 4 to 6 pm, with free admission on Saturday on the House, offered once each month. Timed tickets are required and available at guggenheim.org/tickets. Explore the Guggenheim with our free Digital Guide, a part of the Bloomberg Connects app. Find it in the Apple App Store or in the Google Play Store.

The Guggenheim is implementing health and safety measures in consideration of visitors and employees and in compliance with New York State and City guidelines. Face masks are mandatory inside the museum for anyone over the age of two. New requirements should be reviewed in advance of a visit; they are posted on COVID-19 Safety Measures: What to Expect When Visiting.


Guggenheim Presents Ragnar Kjartansson: Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy

Four-day Exhibition with Live Performance of Popular Love Songs throughout Museum Rotunda

Funders

About the Artist

 

 

 

Guggenheim Schedule of Exhibitions Through 2021

As of October 3, 2020, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is open with required timed ticketing and new safety enhancements. Dates listed below are subject to change. Please contact the Guggenheim Press Office before publishing exhibition dates.

Upcoming Exhibitions

Re/Projections: Video, Film, and Performance for the Rotunda

March 19–September 6, 2021

Conceived in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak, these projects rethink the Guggenheim’s iconic rotunda as a site of assembly, reflection, and amplification. The series opens with a screening program of videos from the museum’s permanent collection, then turns to focus on singular interventions into the museum’s architecture by three of the most compelling artists working today. Each of these varied presentations draws on the building’s unique capacity for distanced gathering to create frameworks for dialogue and mutual care. As audiences convene in the Guggenheim’s landmark space, they encounter new paradigms for navigating tensions between collective and individual experience, asking how we might live together better in an increasingly polarized world.

In Between Days: Video from the Guggenheim Collection
March 19–April 19, 2021

Opening one year after the Guggenheim first closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this screening program highlights recent acquisitions that have gained new resonance during this time of uncertainty and upheaval. The featured works evoke themes of isolation, confrontation, and occupation—states of being that have, for so many, set the terms of daily life for the past year. As such, these videos serve as a prelude for the solo projects to follow, while offering a glimpse into the museum’s rich collection of video and time-based media. The list of included artists will be announced soon.

Christian Nyampeta: Sometimes It Was Beautiful
April 30–June 21, 2021

Artist Christian Nyampeta conceives and organizes convenings, screenings, performances, pedagogical experiments, and publications as hosting structures for collective feeling, cooperative thinking, and mutual action. At the Guggenheim, Nyampeta transforms the iconic rotunda into a “night school,” drawing on Senegalese writer and film director Ousmane Sembène’s notion of cinema as cours du soir. Sembène considered such “evening classes” as providing a learning environment for the working class, informed by the traditions of orality, sensuality, and conviviality within social struggles and hopes in his region and beyond. At the center of the museums’ rotunda, Nyampeta presents the US premiere of his 2018 video Sometimes It Was Beautiful, in which a group of friends convene to watch and critique films made by Swedish cinematographer Sven Nykvist in the Congo between 1948 and 1952. The group discussion highlights enduring tensions surrounding social conversion, cultural property, and who has the right to representation. Mirroring the video’s discursive structure, furniture and graphic interventions on the museum’s ramps play host to a program of interludes animated by the artist’s guests and collaborators. Through music, poetry, readings, screenings, and conversations, Nyampeta’s project considers new models for globalism based in reparation and the possibility of a common world in an age dominated by difference. Drawing from the fundamental precariousness shared across the immense variety and geographic expanses of the African diasporic experience, the program will lend an ear to proposals for reimagining the earth as a whole and shelter for all who inhabit it, human and otherwise. This presentation is organized by Xiaoyu Weng, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator.

Ragnar Kjartansson: Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy
July 2–12, 2021

Following the work’s 2018 premiere at C Project in San Francisco, Ragnar Kjartansson (b. 1976, Reykjavik) stages a new version of Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy at the Guggenheim. In this durational and immersive performance, female singer-guitarists stationed throughout the museum play popular love songs by some of the world’s greatest songwriters. This playlist, however, harbors a dark side: mostly written by men about women, the songs gently—and not so gently—reveal a culture shaped by chauvinism, objectification, and gender violence. As each musician repeats a song for hours at a time, she must personally confront the emotional and physical burden of its content, yet she also joins in a collective ritual that imagines new possibilities for endurance, reclamation, and even joy. At once a live mash-up celebrating pop music and a charged environment of critique, Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy creates a space where contradictions—between individual and group, oppression and liberation, rhythm and chaos—exist together within a community of collaboration and mutual support. This presentation is organized by Nat Trotman, Curator, Performance and Media, with Terra Warren, Curatorial Assistant.

Wu Tsang: Anthem [working title]
July 23September 6, 2021

Specially conceived for the Guggenheim by the artist Wu Tsang (b. 1982, Worcester, Mass.), Anthem (2021) is a large-scale film installation that transforms the rotunda’s architecture into a sonic sculptural space. The work’s title is not intended as a clarion call for action. Instead, Tsang sounds out the complexities and manifold meanings associated with the word “anthem” at different places and times in history, ranging from medieval call-and-response hymns to Proto-Indo-European linguistic suggestions of shimmering voices. Sitting at the intersection of multiple temporalities, Tsang’s anthem invites visitors to think beyond the conventional definition of the word and decentralize the familiar. The installation provides a resonant space for sharing and survival, where audiences can assemble in this moment of anxiety and uncertainty. This presentation is organized by X Zhu-Nowell, Assistant Curator.

Off the Record

April 2–September 27, 2021

Tower 2 Gallery

The collectively accepted communicators of “truth,” historical, documentary, state, and other records assume their authority through their perceived objectivity and comprehensiveness: telling a story from a place of remove, with all relevant details presumed to be included therein. Off the Record challenges this pretense, bringing together the work of contemporary artists from the Guggenheim’s collection who interrogate, revise, or otherwise query dominant narratives and the transmission of culture through a turn to the “record,” both text-based and photographic.

Drawn from the context of journalist reportage, the phrase “off the record” here refers to accounts that have been left outside of or live beyond mainstream chronicles. The exhibition’s title can also be understood in its verb form: to undermine or “kill” the record as a gesture of redress. Featuring works primarily made after 1990, this intergenerational exhibition begins with Sarah Charlesworth  (b. 1947, East Orange, NJ; d. 2013, Falls Village, Conn.), whose foundational redacted-newspaper series Herald Tribune: November 1977 (1977) which underscores the show’s investment in Conceptual, photo-conceptual, archival, language-based, and other art historical legacies. Also included are artists Lorna Simpson (b. 1960, Brooklyn, NY), who implicates the photographic portrait in race-based cultural formations, and Sadie Barnette (b. 1984, Oakland, Calif.), who turns to the FBI file to speak back to the language and reach of the state. Across various manipulations of “records,” artists in this exhibition seek to call out the power dynamics obscured by official or mainstream documentation, complicate the idea of objectivity and truth, and surface new narrative possibilities.

Off the Record features the work of thirteen artists: Sadie Barnette, Sarah Charlesworth, Sara Cwynar, Leslie Hewitt, Tomashi Jackson, Glenn Ligon, Carlos Motta, Lisa Oppenheim, Adrian Piper, Lorna Simpson, Sable E. Smith, Hank Willis Thomas, and Carrie Mae Weems. The exhibition is organized by Ashley James, Associate Curator, Contemporary Art.

A Year with Children 2021

April 30–June 20, 2021

Tower 5 Gallery

Learning Through Art (LTA), the pioneering arts-education program of the Guggenheim Museum is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary by presenting A Year with Children 2021, an exhibition that showcases selected artworks by New York City public-school students in second through sixth grade. These students participated in a year-long artist residency, which partners professional teaching artists with classroom educators in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum. This year, LTA was done entirely remotely due to the pandemic. The exhibition tells the story of both this unique year and the program’s fifty-year history as a hallmark arts education program serving NYC public schools.

Learning Through Art and A Year with Children 2021 are generously supported by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Additional funding is provided by Guggenheim Partners, LLC; The Seth Sprague Educational and Charitable Foundation; Gail May Engelberg and The Engelberg Foundation; The Cornelia T. Bailey Foundation; Libby and Daniel Goldring; Anna Kovner and Seth Meisel; Con Edison; the Sidney E. Frank Foundation; JPMorgan Chase; the Sylvia W. and Randle M. Kauders Foundation; the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Inc.; the Henry E. Niles Foundation, Inc.; and an anonymous donor.

The Leadership Committee for Learning Through Art and A Year with Children 2021 is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

The Hugo Boss Prize 2020: Deana Lawson

May 7–October 11, 2021

Tower 7 Gallery

Deana Lawson (b. 1979, Rochester, NY) has been named the recipient of the 2020 Hugo Boss Prize, a biennial award administered by the Guggenheim Museum that honors significant achievement in contemporary art. The first lens-based artist to receive the prize, Lawson creates medium- and large-format photographs that channel vernacular, art-historical, and documentary traditions within the medium. Picturing individuals she encounters over the course of her everyday life in staged domestic or natural settings, she choreographs scenery, lighting, and pose to create images of Black diasporic identity that powerfully evoke the agency and divinity of her subjects. At once dream-like and entrenched in the mundane, her works cohere into an overarching vision of the human capacity for both embodied connection and spiritual transcendence. Lawson’s solo exhibition of new and recent work will be presented in spring 2021 and is organized by Katherine Brinson, Daskalopoulos Curator, Contemporary Art, and Ashley James, Associate Curator, Contemporary Art.

The Hugo Boss Prize and the exhibition are made possible by HUGO BOSS.

Etel Adnan; Jennie C. Jones; Cecilia Vicuña; and Vasily Kandinsky (title to be announced)

October 8, 2021–August 2, 2022

Rotunda

The Guggenheim Museum presents a series of solo exhibitions in a section of the rotunda, each featuring the work of distinguished contemporary artists Etel Adnan (b. 1925, Beirut), Jennie C. Jones (b. 1968, Cincinnati), and Cecilia Vicuña (b. 1948, Santiago). Presented concurrently and throughout all three of these shows is an exhibition dedicated to the work of Vasily Kandinsky (b. 1866, Moscow; d. 1944, Neuilly-Sur-Seine, France) drawn primarily from the Guggenheim’s extensive holdings. Addressing the legacies of abstraction through critical inflections, these exhibitions explore themes of language, sensory experience, identity, and spirituality.

Vasily Kandinsky
October 8, 2021August 1, 2022

Organized by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance

Three solo exhibitions to be presented between Oct 8, 2020–August 1, 2022, with dates for each to be announced:

Etel Adnan

Organized by Katherine Brinson, Daskalopoulos Curator, Contemporary Art, and Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator, Collections

Jennie C. Jones

Organized by Geaninne Gutiérrez-Guimarães, Associate Curator, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, and Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator, Collections

Cecilia Vicuña

Organized by Pablo León de la Barra, Curator at Large, Latin America, and Geaninne Gutiérrez-Guimarães, Associate Curator, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

Gillian Wearing: Wearing Masks

November 5, 2021–April 4, 2022

Tower Galleries

The photographs, videos, and public sculptures of Gillian Wearing (b. 1963, Birmingham, UK) probe the tensions between self and society in an increasingly media-saturated world. Candid and psychologically intense, Wearing’s work extends the traditions of photographic portraiture initiated by August Sander, Weegee, and Diane Arbus, yet it also foreshadows the cultural transformations wrought by reality TV and social media. For her landmark piece Signs that say what you want them to say and not Signs that say what someone else wants you to say (1992–93), Wearing photographed strangers with placards of their own making. In so doing, she changed the terms of documentary street photography and performance art by giving voice to the subjects of her art. Confess all on video. Don’t worry, you will be in disguise. Intrigued? Call Gillian (1994) continued this theme of confession and self-exposure, exemplifying what would become a keystone of the artist’s practice: asking a diverse group of volunteers to represent their authentic selves from behind protective masks, a process that highlights distinctions between public and private; documentary and fictional realism; and spontaneous versus rehearsed behavior.

Gillian Wearing: Wearing Masks is the first retrospective of Wearing’s work in North America. Featuring over 100 pieces installed across all four of the Guggenheim’s Tower Level galleries, it traces the artist’s development from her earliest Polaroids and videos to her latest photographic self-portraits, which destabilize fixed notions of selfhood and explore the performative nature of identity. Organized by Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography, and Nat Trotman, Curator, Performance and Media, the show will be accompanied by a comprehensive monograph that will survey the artist’s three-decade career with a particular focus on her work of the last decade, including a recent series made in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and a new monument dedicated to Arbus. The Guggenheim is partnering with Public Art Fund to present this sculpture at the entrance to Central Park, in tandem with the exhibition.

The Avant-garde: Experimental Art in South Korea, 1960s–70s [working title]

Late Spring 2022

Tower 4, Thannhauser 4, Tower 5, and Tower 7 Galleries

Opening in 2022, the Guggenheim Museum presents The Avant-garde: Experimental Art in South Korea, 1960s–70s. This is the first exhibition in North America to explore the influential experimental art practices that emerged in South Korea in the decades following the Korean War (1950–53). Spanning the 1960s and the ’70s, it examines a group of loosely affiliated artists whose artistic production reflected and responded to the rapidly changing and globalizing sociopolitical and material conditions that shaped South Korea. The Guggenheim’s show presents the artists’ pioneering approach to materials, process, and performance, and feature seminal pieces across various media including painting, outdoor sculpture, ceramics, video installation, and film to illustrate how artists harnessed the power of contemporary languages of art to explore pressing sociohistorical and metaphysical issues. The Avant-garde: Experimental Art in South Korea, 1960s–70s offers an unprecedented opportunity to experience the creativity and breadth of this remarkable generation of Korean artists. The exhibition is the result of a collaborative research effort between the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (MMCA). It is co-organized by Kyung An, Assistant Curator, Asian Art, Guggenheim, and Soojung Kang, Senior Curator, MMCA.

Exhibitions On View

Away from the Easel: Jackson Pollock’s Mural

Through September 19, 2021

Thannhauser 4 and Monitor 4 Galleries

This focused presentation is dedicated to Jackson Pollock’s 1943 Mural, the artist’s first large-scale painting. Mural has not been exhibited in New York in over twenty years, and this occasion marks its debut at the Guggenheim since the extensive research and restoration project undertaken by the Getty Conservation Institute and the J. Paul Getty Museum. Visionary collector Peggy Guggenheim commissioned Mural for the first floor entrance hall of her Manhattan townhouse, prior to Pollock’s first solo exhibition at her museum-gallery Art of This Century later that same year. Guggenheim’s early support of Pollock’s work arguably established his career. The year 1943 likewise represents a pivotal moment in the evolution of Pollock’s artistic style; though not yet working on the floor and from all sides, the artist began to challenge traditional notions of painting, combining the technique of easel painting with that of mural production, all while further experimenting with abstraction. Away from the Easel: Jackson Pollock’s Mural is organized by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance.

Generous funding for Away from the Easel: Jackson Pollock’s Mural is provided in part by Barbara Slifka; Acquavella Galleries Inc.; Mary and John Pappajohn, Des Moines, Iowa; Audrey and David Mirvish, Toronto; and Mnuchin Gallery.

Additional funding is provided by the Terra Foundation for American Art, LLWW Foundation, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation.

Knotted, Torn, Scattered: Sculpture after Abstraction Expressionism

Through August 2, 2021

Tower 4 Gallery

In conjunction with the exhibition Away from the Easel: Jackson Pollock’s Mural, also on view at the Guggenheim, Knotted, Torn, Scattered: Sculpture after Abstraction Expressionism will consider the legacy of Pollock’s influential painting through work by Guggenheim collection artists from the 1960s and early 1970s, including Lynda Benglis, Robert Morris, Senga Nengudi, Richard Serra, and Tony Smith. The exhibition offers a unique opportunity to view sculptures and installations by a generation of artists who saw in Pollock’s visionary practice urgent questions about scale, materials, process, and environment. This exhibition is organized by Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator, Collections.

Generous funding for Knotted, Torn, Scattered: Sculpture after Abstract Expressionism is provided by the Edlis-Neeson Foundation, LLWW Foundation, Sotheby’s, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation.

The Thannhauser Collection

Ongoing

Thannhauser Gallery 3

Bequeathed to the museum by the art dealer and collector Justin K. Thannhauser and his widow, Hilde Thannhauser, the Thannhauser Collection includes a selection of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century paintings, works on paper, and sculpture that represents the earliest works in the Guggenheim’s holdings. Innovative artists such as Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, Pablo Picasso, and Camille Pissarro laid the groundwork for the development of abstract art in Europe. This presentation, which surveys French modernism in particular, features highlights from the Thannhauser Collection at the Guggenheim. Among the works on display are Picasso’s Woman Ironing (La repasseuse, 1904) and Degas’s Dancers in Green and Yellow (Danseuses vertes et jaunes, 1903). The exhibition is organized by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance.

The Fullness of Color: 1960s Painting

Through March 14, 2021

Tower 5 Gallery

In 1966, the Guggenheim mounted the exhibition Systemic Painting, in which curator Lawrence Alloway pointed to the emergence of an artistic style that “combined economy of form and neatness of surface with fullness of color.” Inspired by this historic show, The Fullness of Color: 1960s Painting presents a group of avant-garde artists whose work, embodying Alloway’s description, began to push abstraction in new directions. In 1952, Helen Frankenthaler pioneered the “soak stain” technique, whereby she manipulated thinned acrylic washes into unprimed cotton fabric of the canvas to produce rich, saturated surfaces. Those who followed over the next decade similarly handled paint as a dye that penetrates the fibers of the canvas rather than as a topical layer brushed over it. Morris Louis and Jules Olitski poured, soaked, or sprayed paint onto canvases, eliminating the gestural stroke that had been central to Abstract Expressionism. In these works, figure and ground became one and the same, united through color. Still other painters in the 1960s approached relationships between form and color through geometric languages, as shown in works by Kenneth Noland and Paul Feeley.

Through examples of works now characterized as Color Field, geometric abstraction, hard-edge, or systemic painting, The Fullness of Color charts several of the varied and complex courses nonrepresentational art followed in the 1960s and into the 1970s and is a reflection of the Guggenheim’s historical engagement with this period. This presentation is organized by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance.

Major support for The Fullness of Color is provided by Barbara Slifka and LLWW Foundation.

Marking Time: Process in Minimal Abstraction

Through March 14, 2021

Tower 7 Gallery

During the 1960s and ’70s, many artists working with abstraction turned toward minimal approaches. As some of them pared compositional, chromatic, and virtuosic flourishes from their work, a singular emphasis on their physical engagement with materials emerged. The pieces they created—whether characterized by interlocking brush strokes, a pencil moved through wet paint, or a pin repeatedly pushed through paper—call on viewers to imaginatively reenact aspects of the creative process. It is a distinctly empathetic mode of engagement that relies on an awareness of one’s own body, as inhabited and inhabiting time, and, perhaps even more important, a consciousness of the embodied experiences of others. Featuring an international array of paintings and works on paper by Agnes Martin, Roman Opałka, Park Seo-Bo, and others, this presentation selected from the Guggenheim’s collection explores this tendency, while considering its rise in multiple milieus and how artists used it to individualized ends. The exhibition is organized by David Horowitz, Assistant Curator.

Major support for Marking Time: Process in Minimal Abstraction is provided by Elizabeth Richebourg Rea.

Countryside, The Future

Through February 15, 2021

Rotunda

Countryside, The Future is an exhibition addressing urgent environmental, political, and socioeconomic issues through the lens of architect and urbanist Rem Koolhaas and Samir Bantal, Director of AMO, the think tank of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA). A unique exhibition for the Guggenheim Museum, Countryside, The Future explores radical changes in the rural, remote, and wild territories collectively identified here as “countryside,” or the 98% of the earth’s surface not occupied by cities, with a full rotunda installation premised on original research. The project presents investigations by AMO, Koolhaas, with students at the Harvard Graduate School of Design; the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing; Wageningen University, Netherlands; and the University of Nairobi. The exhibition examines the modern conception of leisure, large-scale planning by political forces, climate change, migration, human and nonhuman ecosystems, market-driven preservation, artificial and organic coexistence, and other forms of radical experimentation that are altering the landscapes across the world.

Countryside, The Future is organized by Troy Conrad Therrien, Curator of Architecture and Digital Initiatives, in collaboration with Rem Koolhaas and Samir Bantal, Rita Varjabedian, Anne Schneider, Aleksander Zinovev, Sebastian Bernardy, Yotam Ben Hur, Valentin Bansac, with Ashley Mendelsohn, former Assistant Curator, Architecture and Digital Initiatives, at the Guggenheim. Key collaborators include Niklas Maak, Stephan Petermann, Irma Boom, Janna Bystrykh, Clemens Driessen, Lenora Ditzler, Kayoko Ota, Linda Nkatha, Etta Mideva Madete, Keigo Kobayashi, Federico Martelli, Ingo Niermann, James Westcott, Jiang Jun, Alexandra Kharitonova, Sebastien Marot, Fatma al Sahlawi and Vivian Song.

Countryside, The Future is made possible by:

Global Partner Lavazza

Lead Sponsor American Express

Major support provided by IKEA Foundation and Sies Marjan.

Additional support provided by Northern Trust and Design Trust.

The Leadership Committee, chaired by Dasha Zhukova, is gratefully acknowledged for its support, with special thanks to the Blavatnik Family Foundation, Rachel and Jean-Pierre Lehmann, Naomi Milgrom AO, The Durst Organization, Robert M. Rubin and Stéphane Samuel, and an anonymous donor.

Additional funding is provided by Creative Industries Fund NL, the Dutch Culture USA program of the Consulate General of the Netherlands in New York, and the Netherland-America Foundation.

In-kind support for this exhibition provided by NethWork, Infinite Acres, Deutz-Fahr, 80 Acres Farms, Priva, Planet Labs Inc., Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Volkswagen, Gieskes-Strijbis Fonds, and AMO B.V.

Guggenheim Collection: Brancusi

Through February 8, 2021

Tower 2 Gallery

In gallery space devoted to the permanent collection, the Guggenheim is showcasing its rich holdings of the work of Constantin Brancusi (b. 1876, Hobitza Romania; d. 1957, Paris). In the early decades of the twentieth century, Brancusi produced an innovative body of work that altered the trajectory of modern sculpture. During this period, Brancusi lived in Paris, then a thriving artistic center where many modernist tenets were being developed and debated. He became an integral part of these conversations both through his relationships with other artists, such as Marcel Duchamp, Fernand Léger, Amedeo Modigliani, and Henri Rousseau, and through his own pioneering work. His aspiration to express the essence of his subjects through simplified forms and his engagement with non–Western European artistic traditions led to new stylistic approaches. In addition, his mode of presentation, which equally emphasized sculpture and base and in which works were shown in direct relation to one another, instead of as independent entities, introduced new ways of thinking about the nature of the art object.

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum began collecting Brancusi’s work in-depth in the mid-1950s under the leadership of its second director, James Johnson Sweeney. When Sweeney began his tenure at the museum, the collection was focused on nonobjective painting. Sweeney significantly expanded the scope of the institution’s holdings, bringing in other styles and mediums, particularly sculpture. The Guggenheim’s commitment to Brancusi during these years extended beyond its collecting priorities, and in 1955 the museum held the first major exhibition of the artist’s work. This presentation is supported in part by the Romanian Cultural Institute in New York.

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

Peggy Guggenheim Collection

Visitor Information

Admission: Adults $25, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. Open Thursdays through Mondays from 11 am to 6 pm. Pay What You Wish hours are Saturdays from 4 to 6 pm. Timed tickets are required and available at guggenheim.org/tickets. Explore the Guggenheim with our free Digital Guide, a part of the Bloomberg Connects app. Find it in the Apple App Store or in the Google Play Store.

The Guggenheim is implementing health and safety measures in consideration of visitors and employees and in compliance with New York State and City guidelines. Face masks are mandatory inside the museum for anyone over the age of two. New requirements should be reviewed in advance of a visit; they are posted on COVID-19 Safety Measures: What to Expect When Visiting.

For publicity images, visit guggenheim.org/press
Password: presspass

guggenheim.org/social

#1591
December 16, 2020

For Additional Information

HOURS



Dear Friends,

Hope this email find you safe and happy!

Due to Covid-19 situation, the YV Art Museum/CAI Art Grounds still remain closed, which means we have canceled all activities, including Container Man concert and all other exhibitions. However, the Stone Carving Symposium is on-going and will be drawing to its conclusion soon.

We predict that we will remain close until the late Spring of 2021. Hopefully, everyone will have received vaccine by then.

Meanwhile, we are using this time to improve our art grounds, several new sculptures have been installed and a sculpture walking trail has been cultivated.  This large scale improvement takes time and energy, so we are using this "quiet time" to get it done. So that we can present a "brand new world" to you when the world is safe again.

Herewith I would like to share with you some examples: (3 artwork by Yin and Viktor, respectively entitled: "Laugh Lifter", "Speed Tricycle On Sale" and "Final Hole")

Very Best from Yin and Viktor

Yin Peet & Viktor Lois

Executive Director & Artistic Director
Contemporary Arts International (CAI)
68 Quarry Road, Acton, MA 01720
Phone: 617-699-6401  
Contemporary Arts International (CAI), also known as YV Art Museum, is a non-profit, 501c3 tax-exempt organization located in a 12-acre granite quarry in Acton MA. The mission of CAI is to promote the creation, understanding and appreciation of contemporary arts in the global context through art education, residency, exhibition, and international symposium. For more information, visit www.contemporaryartsinternational.org   or www.YVARTMUSEUM.ORG

Guggenheim Presents Knotted, Torn, Scattered: Sculpture after Abstract Expressionism

Exhibition considers artistic explorations of scale, material, and process Exhibition: Knotted, Torn, Scattered: Sculpture after Abstract Expressionism 
Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York 
Location: Robert Mapplethorpe Gallery/Tower 4 
Dates: October 3, 2020–September 19, 2021

(NEW YORK, NY – September 18, 2020)— As part of the October 3 public reopening, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Knotted, Torn, Scattered: Sculpture after Abstract Expressionism, an exhibition that considers the diverse ways that artists in the 1960s and ’70s responded to the achievements of Abstract Expressionist painters to formulate unique approaches to sculptural practice. Knotted, Torn, Scattered features works from the Guggenheim collection by Lynda Benglis, Maren Hassinger, Robert Morris, Senga Nengudi, Richard Serra, and Tony Smith. These artists saw in postwar painting urgent questions about scale, material, and process. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with Away from the Easel: Jackson Pollock’s Mural, offering a rare opportunity to view Pollock’s breakthrough painting Mural (1943) in proximity to works that expand and challenge the meaning of the artist’s legacy. Knotted, Torn, Scattered: Sculpture after Abstract Expressionism is organized by Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator, Collections. Generous funding for this exhibition is provided by the Edlis-Neeson Foundation, Sotheby’s, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation. In the years following World War II, Pollock and other Abstract Expressionist artists redefined American painting. After Pollock’s death in 1956, a new generation saw in his work the impetus to create not expressive canvases, but sculptures that explored fundamental experiences of space, materials, and bodily mechanics. As artist and writer Allan Kaprow argued, “[M]ural-scale paintings ceased to [be] paintings and became environments.” The work in Knotted, Torn, Scattered exemplifies a shift in emphasis in American art—from gestural painting toward explorations of the physical properties of materials. A pivotal piece featured in the exhibition is Richard Serra’s Belts (1966–67), an installation of industrial rubber coils and neon. The artist has described the work as “structurally related to Pollock’s Mural. If my origins culminated in anything, they culminated in Pollock. Then I felt I needed to move into literal space.” Lynda Benglis attempted to “get off the wall with the canvas” by transforming her painted surfaces into knotted sculptural objects. Tony Smith’s Wingbone (1962) demonstrates the translation of spiritual ambitions through organic geometries in his human-scaled forms. Influenced by dance and collaborative performance, works by Maren Hassinger and Senga Nengudi demonstrate how process-oriented practices could also register a social experience beyond the singular actions of the artist. A recent acquisition, Hassinger’s Untitled (1972/2020), comprised of eight lengths of nautical rope repeatedly hand-spliced and hung in an evocative installation, is on public view for the first time. Like Robert Morris’s Untitled (Pink Felt) (1970), Hassinger’s installation is an index of the artist’s interactions with industrial materials.

VISITOR INFORMATION

Admission: Adults $25, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. Open Thursdays through Mondays from 11 am to 6 pm. Pay What You Wish hours are Fridays and Saturdays from 4 to 6 pm. Timed tickets are required and available at guggenheim.org/tickets. Explore the Guggenheim with our free Digital Guide, a part of the Bloomberg Connects app. Find it in the Apple App Store or in the Google Play Store. The Guggenheim is implementing health and safety measures in consideration of visitors and employees and in compliance with New York State and City guidelines. Face masks will be mandatory inside the museum for anyone over the age of two. New requirements should be reviewed in advance of a visit; they are posted on COVID-19 Safety Measures: What to Expect When Visiting

Guggenheim Establishes Conservation Fellowship with Support from Trustee Vladimir Potanin

(VENICE, ITALY/NEW YORK, NY—May 9, 2019)—At a special event at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, held on the occasion of the vernissage of the 2019 Venice Biennale, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation announced the establishment of an international fellowship program in the conservation of modern and contemporary art made possible through an endowment by Guggenheim Trustee Vladimir Potanin.
To illustrate the range of issues the fellowship program will address, the announcement was made in conjunction with a panel discussion titled “Preserving the Future: Conserving Contemporary Art in the Digital Age,” led by Lena Stringari, Deputy Director and Chief Conservator at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. The Vladimir Potanin Conservation Fellowship will give an outstanding Russian-speaking conservation professional the opportunity to deeply engage with the work of the Guggenheim for a period of twelve to eighteen months and to consider, through first-hand experience, the role of conservation in an increasingly global world. The program was supported by and developed in collaboration with the Vladimir Potanin Foundation and Vladimir Potanin, a Trustee of the Board of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation since 2002 and Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg since 2003.
Richard Armstrong, Director of the Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, said in a statement: “Ambitious cross-cultural initiatives such as the Vladimir Potanin Conservation Fellowship can ensure that new generations are engaged stakeholders in preserving cultural heritage. Thanks to the generous support and foresight of Vladmir Potanin, this fellowship will contribute significantly to the international field of conservation, encourage new areas of scholarship, and bring together conservators, artists, scientists and historians to explore complex issues around the preservation of materials and methods of modern and contemporary art. We are grateful to our friend and trustee Vladimir Potanin for his generosity, but even more so for his prescience in recognizing the critical need for this work.”
Vladimir Potanin said in a statement: “In today’s world, it is more urgent than ever to develop and support platforms that combine creativity with knowledge, innovation with heritage, and establish dialogue between cultures and communities. Having preservation and conservation as their primary goals, modern museums must address local and global societal issues and share solutions across geographic and political boundaries. The Guggenheim is a leader among museums for its global outlook, intellectual daring, and record of achievement in scholarship and conservation. No institution is better prepared to undertake this fellowship program in modern and contemporary art. I am proud that the Vladimir Potanin Conservation Fellows will contribute to these vital efforts to advance understanding in the field, cultivate new talent, and promote cross-cultural exchange.”
While in residence at the Guggenheim in New York, the Potanin Conservation Fellow will contribute to ongoing collection research and to preparation for exhibitions in various stages of development, working alongside the Guggenheim Museum’s team to learn conservation techniques. The program will be designed to consider Guggenheim priorities as well as those of the fellow’s home museum and the fellow’s background and interests. The inaugural fellow in 2020 will work closely with Guggenheim conservators on an in-depth study of paintings in the museum’s collection by Vasily Kandinsky, to elucidate the artist’s methods and to assist in the preparation the canvases for a traveling exhibition.
The Conservation Department at the Guggenheim Museum is currently accepting applications for the Vladimir Potanin Conservation Fellowship through its website (www.guggenheim.org/careers); the deadline is June 15, 2019 for a projected January 2020 start date.
Under the leadership of Lena Stringari, the Guggenheim’s Conservation Department collaborates with curators, scholars, engineers, scientists, and artists by conducting art-historical and scientific research on works in the museum’s collection; implementing policies and procedures to ensure the maintenance and long-term preservation of the works; establishing best practices for storage, transportation, and art handling; and undertaking projects designed to address new conservation issues. The Guggenheim’s conservation team has made important contributions to the field of time-based media and has developed new methodologies for treating unconventional artworks and for preserving both tangible and intangible resources. Together, these activities in research, treatment, and findings have made the Guggenheim a leader in the field of conservation.
The panel discussion “Preserving the Future: Conserving Contemporary Art in the Digital Age” was led by Stringari, who has overseen didactic exhibitions including Imageless: The Scientific Study and Experimental Treatment of an Ad Reinhardt Black Painting (2008) and Jackson Pollock: Exploring Alchemy (2017). She played a key role in formulating the Panza Collection Initiative and the Variable Media Initiative at the Guggenheim. She has served as an adjunct professor at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, and has lectured extensively on the conservation of contemporary art.
Stringari was joined by:
  • Ysbrand Hummelen, Senior Researcher at the State Heritage Laboratory of the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands.
  • Dimitri Ozerkov, Head of the Contemporary Art Department of the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, and Head of the Hermitage 20/21 Project for Contemporary Art.
  • Alisa Prudnikova, Director of Regional Development of ROSIZO-NCCA (National Centre of Contemporary Art) and Commissioner and Artistic Director of the Ural Industrial Biennial of Contemporary Art

ABOUT THE VLADIMIR POTANIN FOUNDATION

The Vladimir Potanin Foundation, one of the largest private grant-making organizations in Russia, was established in 1999 by entrepreneur Vladimir Potanin to implement socially significant long-term projects in education and culture.
The mission of the Foundation is to bring together creative professionals who play a key role in solving current public issues and work to develop a culture of strategic philanthropy in Russia. Through joint training programs aimed at strengthening partnerships and networking within the museum-professional community, the Foundation has engaged with such institutions as the Trust for Mutual Understanding, the Robert Bosch Stiftung, the Institut Français de Russie, la Caixa Foundation, the University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School, and others. The program of cultural leadership run in partnership with the Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, has featured the participation of cultural leaders from around the world, including Eike Schmidt, Director of the Uffizi Gallery, Florence; filmmaker Alexander Sokurov; Laurence des Cars, Director of the Musée d’Orsay, Paris; Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation; and Alistair Spalding, Artistic Director and Chief Executive of Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London. Some of the recent projects supported by the Foundation will be showcased at the Venice Biennale, including NEMOSKVA, a project of interregional cooperation in the field of contemporary art that will present an exhibition at BOZAR, Brussels, in July.
Many of the projects and programs initiated and administrated by the Foundation have been acknowledged as role models in Russia, and technologies it developed are widely used by other foundations, nongovernmental bodies, and cultural and educational organizations. Over the past twenty years, more than four hundred Russian museums have benefited from the support of the Foundation.

ABOUT VLADIMIR POTANIN

Vladimir Potanin is a Moscow-born businessman, investor, and philanthropist. Throughout his career, Potanin has devoted a major portion of his time and resources to charity projects. In order to structure these efforts effectively, he founded the Vladimir Potanin Foundation in 1999 to foster the development of strategic philanthropy in Russia. In 2010 Potanin made a public commitment to give a majority of his wealth to philanthropic causes, and in 2013 he became the first Russian corporate leader to join the Giving Pledge initiative announced by Bill Gates and Warren Buffett.
He has been a Trustee of the Board of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation since 2002 and was elected Chairman of the Board of the State Hermitage Museum in 2003. Along with General Director Mikhail Piotrovsky, Potanin is the founder of the Endowment Fund of the State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg.
Potanin has inspired and supported significant projects that promote Russian culture globally, such as the Russian Lounge project in the John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts, Washington, D.C., and a major exhibition When Russia Spoke French: Paris–St. Petersburg 1800–1830 at the Hotel des Invalides, Paris (2003). In 2005 the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presented Russia!, an exhibition supported by the Vladimir Potanin Foundation, which featured more than 275 masterpieces from collections of the State Hermitage Museum; State Russian Museum, Saint Petersburg; Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow; and the Kremlin State Historical and Cultural Museum and Heritage Site, Moscow.
In recognition of his role in an extraordinary collective donation of more than 250 works of Soviet and Russian contemporary art to the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Republic of France inducted Potanin into the Légion d’honneur in 2016.

ABOUT THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation was established in 1937 and is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of modern and contemporary art through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim international constellation of museums includes the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao; and the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. In 2019, the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum celebrates 60 years as an architectural icon and “temple of spirit” where radical art and architecture meet. To learn more about the museum and the Guggenheim’s activities around the world, visit guggenheim.org.

Over 65 million people around the world have been forced from their homes to escape famine, climate change, and war in the greatest human displacement since World War II. Join us at the Museum of Fine Arts, Bostonfor a screening of "Human Flow"(2017, 140 min.), an epic film journey led by the internationally renowned artist Ai Weiwei that gives a powerful visual expression to this massive human migration. The documentary elucidates both the staggering scale of the refugee crisis and its profoundly personal human impact.

Captured over the course of an eventful year in 23 countries, the film follows a chain of urgent human stories that stretches across the globe, documenting migration in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, France, Greece, Germany, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Kenya, Mexico, and Turkey. Human Flow bears witness to a desperate search for safety, shelter, and justice, from teeming refugee camps to perilous ocean crossings, from dislocation and disillusionment to courage and endurance, from the haunting lure of lives left behind to the unknown potential of the future. 

This visceral work of cinema is a testament to the resilience of the human spirit and poses an urgent question: will our global society renounce fear, isolation, and self-interest and choose a path of openness, freedom, and respect for humanity?

Guggenheim Museum to Open Daily Beginning in 2019 In Honor of 60th Anniversary of Landmark Building

Kicking Off Anniversary Year of Exhibitions and Programming, Museum Will Open Seven Days a Week as of January 7, and Close Late on Tuesdays and Saturdays

Guggenheim Museum 


(NEW YORK, NY—December 11, 2018)—In 2019 the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum celebrates 60 years as an architectural icon. Since opening its doors on October 21, 1959, the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building has inspired generations of visitors as a unique “temple of spirit” where radical art and architecture meet. The Guggenheim will initiate a new seven-day-a-week schedule with evening hours on Tuesdays and Saturdays to coincide with this milestone.
Museum events leading up to the building’s anniversary day in October will offer members and the public new opportunities for inspiration, connection, and contemplation. On-site tours and activities will explore the history and details of the architectural masterpiece, and The Wright restaurant and Cafe 3 will update their menus with favorites of the museum’s visionary founders. Guggenheim fans around the world can look forward to behind-the-scenes videos, a blog series featuring guest writers from the fields of architecture and design, and a chance to share their own transformative experiences in the museum using the hashtag #Guggenheim60.
During the anniversary year, members and the public are invited to celebrate with the Guggenheim through in-depth exhibitions of the museum’s collection, and programs that highlight the connection between art and architecture. More information will follow in 2019.

MUSEUM HOURS


Starting January 7, the Guggenheim Museum will be open seven days a week from 10 am to 5:30 pm, and until 8 pm on Tuesdays and Saturdays, including pay-what-you-wish from 5 pm to 8 pm on Saturdays.

EXHIBITIONS


Exhibitions on view in 2019 contemplate the museum’s own history as an early advocate for abstract art while expanding and challenging conventional art-historical narratives with new critical perspectives. Presentations include an introduction to the long-underrecognized innovator of abstract art Hilma af Klint; an artist-led examination of the museum’s collection by Paul Chan, Cai Guo-Qiang, Jenny Holzer, Julie Mehretu, Richard Prince, and Carrie Mae Weems in Artistic License: Six Takes on the Guggenheim Collection; a celebratory solo show by 2018 Hugo Boss Prize-winner, Simone Leigh; an exploration of the legacy of Robert Mapplethorpe; and a focused investigation through the lens of social justice on a formative chapter in the career of Jean-Michel Basquiat. The complete schedule of exhibitions through 2020 is available at guggenheim.org/press.

ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS


Art in the Round Architecture Tours, Fridays, 2 pm
Beginning January 4, these weekly building tours are for everyone from first-time visitors to lifelong Frank Lloyd Wright fans.
Saturday Sketching, Saturdays, 10 am–4 pm
Teens and families will explore Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural shapes and spaces through drawing activities in the museum’s galleries.
Silent Nights, Tuesday, January 8, 7–8 pmVisitors can view exhibitions and experience the museum in a quiet, contemplative atmosphere. Beginning February 5, Silent Nights will take place on the first Tuesday evening of every month.
Architecture Family Tours, Sundays, February 10 and April 14, 10:30 am–12 pm
Part of the monthly Second Sunday Family Tours, this interactive, family-friendly tour will explore the history, spaces, and shapes of the building and be accompanied by creative, hands-on gallery activities.
Open Studio: For Teens, By Teens, May 19, 1–4 pm
During this special drop-in program for high school students, Guggenheim Teen Volunteers will lead their peers in an afternoon of art-making activities centered around the museum’s architecture.
Drawing the Guggenheim, October 2019
A transatlantic collaboration featuring the Guggenheim’s international constellation of museums, Drawing the Guggenheim is a day of activities centered on drawing the iconic architecture of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; and the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao.
Learn about the Frank Lloyd Wright Building
Explore the rich history of the Guggenheim’s landmark museum. Archival images of Wright’s masterpiece, audio about the building’s development and construction, and information about architecture tours and programs can all be found at guggenheim.org/building.

ABOUT THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION


The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation was established in 1937 and is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of modern and contemporary art through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim international constellation of museums includes the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao; and the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. In 2019, the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum celebrates 60 years as an architectural icon and “temple of spirit” where radical art and architecture meet. To learn more about the museum and the Guggenheim’s activities around the world, visit guggenheim.org.

Giacometti on View through September 12 at the Guggenheim Museum FINAL WEEKS Giacometti Through September 12, 2018 

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents the work of the Alberto Giacometti (1901–1966)—the first major museum exhibition in the United States in more than 15 years dedicated to the Swiss-born artist. Installed within the museum’s rotunda, Giacometti examines this preeminent modernist who is renowned for the distinctive figurative sculptures that he produced in reaction to the trauma and anguish of World War II, including a series of elongated standing women, striding men, and expressive bust-length portraits. The exhibition encompasses the entirety of the artist’s career, featuring nearly 200 sculptures, paintings, and drawings, some of which have never before been shown in the United States, as well as archival photographs and ephemera. ALSO ON VIEW Current exhibitions include One Hand Clapping, a presentation of newly commissioned works in mediums ranging from oil to canvas to virtual-reality software that explore the ways in which globalization affects our understanding of the future. Also on view are Guggenheim Collection: Brancusi, a selection of sculptures from the museum’s holdings; and the Thannhauser Collection, showcasing works by artists including Vasily Kandinsky, Henri Matisse, and Pablo Picasso. TUESDAY EVENINGS The Guggenheim is open late, until 9pm, on Tuesdays through September 11. Visitors may enjoy open galleries, music and craft cocktails in the rotunda, and special summer programs including Summer of Know, a conversation series with talks planned for September 4 and September 11. PUBLIC PROGRAMS AND FILM SCREENINGS Conversations with Contemporary Artists: Reimagining the Life of Flora Mayo with Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler Wednesday, September 5, 6:30 pm In the Swiss Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennial, the Swiss-American duo Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler presented Flora, a film installation and its accompanying work, Bust. The work employs reconstruction, re-enactment, and documentary material to imagine the life of Flora Mayo, a largely unknown American artist who was Alberto Giacometti’s lover while she studied in Paris in the 1920s. In this special evening program on the occasion of the Guggenheim’s presentation of Giacometti, the artists reflect on their research, ideas of reframing history, and their newly made discoveries with relation to the 20th-century master. Program concludes with a reception and exhibition viewing. $15, $10 members, free for students with RSVP. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar. Film Screenings Screenings take place in the New Media Theater, Level B, and are free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/films. Alberto Giacometti (1966), dir. Ernst Scheidegger and Peter Münger, 28 min. Fridays through September 7 3 pm, 3:30 pm, and 4 pm A short documentary film focusing on Alberto Giacometti, featuring exclusive footage of the artist at work in his studio. Codirector Ernst Scheidegger first met Giacometti in 1943. Their encounter developed into a lifelong friendship out of which grew the most comprehensive collection of photographs and films to document the life and works of the artist. Courtesy of the Ernst Scheidegger Archive. Final Portrait (2017), dir. Stanley Tucci, 90 min. Tuesdays through August 28, 6:30 pm In 1964, while on a short trip to Paris, the American writer and art lover James Lord is asked by his friend, the world-renowned artist Alberto Giacometti, to sit for a portrait. The process, Giacometti assures Lord, will take only a few days. Flattered and intrigued, Lord agrees. So begins not only the story of an offbeat friendship but, seen through the eyes of Lord, an insightful look into the beauty, frustration, profundity, and at times, downright chaos of the artistic process. Final Portrait is a portrait of a genius and of a friendship between two men who are utterly different, yet increasingly bonded through a single, ever-evolving act of creativity. Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics. Giacometti is organized by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and Catherine Grenier, Director, Fondation Giacometti, Paris. Mathilde Lecuyer-Maillé, Associate Curator, Fondation Giacometti, and Samantha Small, Curatorial Assistant, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, provided support. Exhibition Support Giacometti is made possible by Lavazza. Additional support is provided by Northern Trust. The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its support, with special thanks to Linda Macklowe, Chair, as well as Acquavella Galleries, Larry Gagosian, FX and Natasha de Mallmann, Hauser & Wirth, Per Skarstedt, Ulla Dreyfus-Best, Grande Albergo Excelsior Vittoria - Sorrento, kamel mennour, Gigi and Andrea Kracht, La Prairie, Lévy Gorvy, Richard Gray Gallery, Thomas Ammann Fine Art AG, Thomas Gibson Fine Art, and those who wish to remain anonymous. Funding is also provided by Christie’s and the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. It is co-organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and the Fondation Giacometti, Paris. VISITOR INFORMATION Admission: Adults $25, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. The Guggenheim’s free app, available with admission or by download to personal devices, offers an enhanced visitor experience. The app features content on special exhibitions as well as access to more than 1,500 works in the Guggenheim’s permanent collection. Additionally, information about the museum’s landmark building is available in English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Verbal Description guides for select exhibitions are also included for visitors who are blind or have low vision. The Guggenheim app is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies. Museum Hours: Sun–Wed, 10 am–5:45 pm; Fri, 10 am–5:45 pm; Sat, 10 am–7:45 pm; closed Thurs. On Saturdays, beginning at 5pm, the museum hosts Pay What You Wish. For general information, call 212 423 3500 or visit the museum online at: guggenheim.org.

Guggenheim Museum Presents Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future

First Major Solo Exhibition in the United States Offers Historic Look at af Klint’s Artistic Achievements

Accompanied by an exhibition of new work by R. H. Quaytman on Rotunda Level 6









(NEW YORK, NY—April 3, 2018)—From October 12, 2018, to January 27, 2019, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum will present the first major solo exhibition in the United States of the Swedish artist Hilma af Klint (1862–1944). When af Klint began creating radically abstract paintings in 1906, they were like little that had been seen before: bold, colorful, and untethered from recognizable references to the physical world. It was several years before Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian, and others would take similar strides to free their own artwork of representational content. Yet af Klint never exhibited her remarkably forward-looking paintings and, convinced the world was not ready for them, stipulated that they not be shown for 20 years following her death. Ultimately, her work was not exhibited until 1986, and it is only over the past three decades that her paintings and works on paper have received serious attention.
Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future will offer an opportunity to experience af Klint’s artistic achievements in the Guggenheim’s rotunda more than a century after she began her daring work. Curated by Tracey Bashkoff, Director of Collections and Senior Curator, with the assistance of David Horowitz, Curatorial Assistant, and organized with the cooperation of the Hilma af Klint Foundation, Stockholm, the exhibition will feature more than 160 of af Klint’s artworks and focus on the artist’s breakthrough years, 1906–20. It is during this period that she began to produce nonobjective and stunningly imaginative paintings, creating a singular body of work that invites a reevaluation of modernism and its development.
In conjunction with Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future, the museum will present the 34th chapter of paintings by R. H. Quaytman, whose abiding interest in af Klint extends back to 1989, when Quaytman organized an exhibition on the Swedish artist at New York’s P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center. In these new works, Quaytman will engage af Klint’s aesthetic language and spiritually charged subject matter, reexamining both through the lens of the Guggenheim Museum’s founding ethos, which was indebted to the art and theories of Kandinsky and culminated with commissioning Frank Lloyd Wright to design “a temple of the spirit.”
Hilma af Klint was born in Stockholm in 1862 and went on to study painting at the city’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts, graduating with honors in 1887. She soon established herself as a respected painter in Stockholm, exhibiting deftly rendered figurative paintings and serving briefly as secretary of the Society for Swedish Women Artists. During these years, she also became deeply engaged with spiritualism, Rosicrucianism, and Theosophy. These forms of spirituality, which were also of keen interest to other artists, including Kandinsky, František Kupka, Malevich, and Mondrian, were widely popular across Europe and the United States, as people sought to reconcile long-held religious beliefs with scientific advances and a new awareness of the global plurality of religions.
Af Klint developed her new approach to art making together with her spiritual practice, outside of Stockholm’s male-dominated art world. She had begun to regularly hold séances with four other women by 1896. During a meeting in 1906, one of the spirits that the group often channeled asked af Klint to create a cycle of paintings. Af Klint immediately accepted. She worked on the project between 1906 and 1915, completing 193 paintings and works on paper collectively called The Paintings for the Temple. These works, which included her first forays into nonobjectivity, were a radical break from the more staid paintings she produced as part of her public practice. Stylistically, they are strikingly diverse, utilizing biomorphic and geometric forms, expansive and intimate scales, and maximalist and reductivist approaches to composition and color. She imagined installing them in a spiral temple, but the building never came to fruition. After she completed The Paintings for the Temple, af Klint continued to test the limits of her new abstract vocabulary. In these years, she experimented with form, theme, and seriality, creating some of her most incisive works.
The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue featuring eight scholarly essays and a roundtable discussion. Contributions by leading art historians and contemporary artists delve into such topics as af Klint’s relationship to modernism, her engagement with new understandings of science and spirituality, and how her work allows us to expand and reimagine the cannon.

PUBLIC PROGRAMS


A series of public and educational programs will be presented in conjunction with Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future. Program additions, information, and schedules are available at guggenheim.org/calendar.
Music for the Temple: A Tribute to Hilma af Klint by John Zorn
Thursday & Friday, November 29 & 30, 7 pm
Composer John Zorn presents a concert of new music composed in response to the work of Hilma af Klint.

EXHIBITION SUPPORT


Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future is supported in part by the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation and The Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation.

ABOUT THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION


Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.
Five Artists Envision the Future in New Commissions at the Guggenheim
One Hand Clapping Features Works by Cao Fei, Duan Jianyu, Lin Yilin, Wong
Ping, and Samson Young and is the Third Exhibition of The Robert H. N. Ho
Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative
曹斐、段建宇、林一林、黄炳和楊嘉辉

Exhibition: One Hand Clapping
Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location: Tower Levels 5 and 7
Dates: May 4 to October 21, 2018










(NEW YORK, NY—March 27, 2018)—The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents One Hand Clapping, a group exhibition of newly commissioned works by Cao Fei, Duan Jianyu, Lin Yilin, Wong Ping, and Samson Young. The exhibition is the third of The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative, a research, curatorial, and collections-building program begun in 2013. On view from May 4 through October 21, 2018, One Hand Clapping will be accompanied by a catalogue and public and educational programming.

The artists in One Hand Clapping explore our changing relationship with the future. Produced in both new and traditional mediums—from virtual reality technology to oil on canvas—their commissioned works challenge visions of a global, homogeneous, and technocratic future. On Tower Level 5, Wong Ping creates a multimedia installation centered on a colorful, racy animated tale that explores the tension between an aging population and the relentless pace of a digital economy; in her paintings and sculptures, Duan Jianyu depicts a surreal, transitory place where the rural meets the urban; and Lin Yilin constructs a virtual-reality simulation featuring a professional basketball star, testing the potential for using technology to inhabit the experience of another. On Tower Level 7, Cao Fei examines the new realities and potential crisis driven by automation and robotics at some of China’s most advanced storage and distribution facilities, and Samson Young reflects on our obsession with ritual and authenticity through a sonic and sculptural environment of imaginary musical instruments and their digitally engineered sounds.

The exhibition title One Hand Clapping is derived from a koan—riddles used in Zen Buddhist practice to challenge logical reasoning—that asks, “We know the sound of two hands clapping. But what is the sound of one hand clapping?” Emerging from a tradition that originates in China’s Tang period (618– 907), the phrase “one hand clapping” encompasses a history of cross-cultural translation and appropriation that continues into the present, from its citation as the epigraph to J. D. Salinger’s Nine Stories (1953) to its referencing in the titles of a Cantopop song and an Australian film and the name of a British band. In this light, “one hand clapping” becomes a metaphor for the processes by which meaning is fabricated, transmitted, and restated in a globalized world. The image of “one hand clapping” also suggests connotations of solitude and the ability of artists to put forth a singular perspective and to challenge prevailing beliefs, stereotypes, and conventional power structures. One Hand Clapping is organized by Xiaoyu Weng, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art, and Hou Hanru, Consulting Curator, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. Kyung An, Assistant Curator, Asian Art, provides curatorial support. The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative is part of the Guggenheim’s Asian Art Initiative, directed by Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Art, and Senior Advisor, Global Arts. “The work of the artists in this third iteration of The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative epitomizes the fresh artistic energy coming out of Greater China and fosters deeper perspectives on the art of our time,” said Richard Armstrong, Director, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation. “We are deeply grateful to Robert H. N. Ho, Founder, and Robert Y. C. Ho, Chairman, for their vision in advancing this ambitious venture and their enthusiasm and dedication to furthering the scholarship, innovation, and accessibility of the art and culture of Greater China.”

"The Chinese Art Initiative seeks to support the Guggenheim's vision for contemporary art, which reaches beyond the confines of geographical and cultural boundaries. It engages Chinese artists and their creativity in diverse contexts, acknowledging the complexity of contemporary art practice as a global phenomenon," said Robert Y. C. Ho, Chairman, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation. "The Guggenheim has built upon its expertise to integrate the voices of the Chinese artists into multiple discourses. Through the creative endeavors of both the artists and the museum, we encourage meaningful interactions with various art perspectives as well as deeper thinking about the intrinsic value of art in today's globalized world."

“Through The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative, we have sought to challenge, deconstruct, and redefine ideas of ‘contemporary Chinese art’ and to present some of the most thoughtful and provocative artworks being made today,” said Xiaoyu Weng. “For this concluding phase of the initiative, we invited these five artists to think with us about how art that imagines the future also reflects our understanding of the present and the past. Shaped by the artists’ bold imaginations, sharp social critique, and humor, their newly created works encourage and inspire possibilities for a future art to come.”

Guggenheim Museum Presents Giacometti, Opening June 8

Major Exhibition Explores Decades of Work by 20th-Century Master, Assembling Celebrated Figurative Sculptures alongside Paintings and Drawings


(NEW YORK, NY—March 1, 2018)—From June 8 to September 12, 2018, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum will present the work of the Alberto Giacometti (1901–1966)—the first major museum exhibition in the United States in more than 15 years dedicated to the Swiss-born artist. Installed within the museum’s rotunda, Giacometti examines this preeminent modernist who is renowned for the distinctive figurative sculptures that he produced in reaction to the trauma and anguish of World War II, including a series of elongated standing women, striding men, and expressive bust-length portraits. The exhibition encompasses the entirety of the artist’s career, featuring more than 175 sculptures, paintings, and drawings, some of which have never before been shown in the United States, as well as archival photographs and ephemera.
Giacometti is organized by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and Catherine Grenier, Director, Fondation Giacometti, Paris, with support provided by Mathilde Lecuyer-Maillé, Associate Curator, Fondation Giacometti, and Samantha Small, Curatorial Assistant, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
The exhibition underscores the historical relationship between the Guggenheim Museum and Giacometti. In 1955, in a temporary location, the Guggenheim organized the first-ever museum presentation of Giacometti’s work, which was also the earliest significant exhibition that the Guggenheim dedicated to sculpture. Under the leadership of then director James Johnson Sweeney, the museum brought key sculptures by Giacometti into its collection during this period in an effort to integrate the medium into its holdings and to support “the art of today.” In 1974, in the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building, the Guggenheim organized a posthumous retrospective devoted to Giacometti. Beginning in the 1940s Peggy Guggenheim, Solomon’s niece, amassed Giacometti’s works along with examples of Surrealist and abstract art that would travel with her from New York to Europe and form the core of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, now part of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.
Visitors to this fresh presentation on Giacometti will have the opportunity to view works from across his career, which largely was spent in France and which spanned several decades and various mediums. Examples of his early production reveal his engagement with Cubism and Surrealism as well as African, Oceanic, and Cycladic art, and reflect interactions with writers including Jean-Paul Sartre and Samuel Beckett. The exhibition’s selection of Giacometti’s paintings and drawings demonstrates his attempt to capture the essence of humanity-an endeavor that is also apparent in his incessant sculptural investigations of the human body. Sculptures of various heights will be installed on pedestals in the round or set back into the museum’s walls. Displayed in vitrines, a number of pocket-size figures and heads created immediately before World War II explore spatial concerns of perspective and distance that would become paramount to his work. Giacometti’s studio practice, a particular focus of the exhibition, is shown through rarely exhibited plaster sculptures. The artist painted some of these works or later cast them in bronze, but others’ intended medium was plaster. Rich historical photographs and ephemera, such as journals and sketchbooks containing drawings, also provide insight into Giacometti’s process and document his artistic development.
Giacometti features selections from the Fondation Giacometti and celebrated works from the Guggenheim collection, such as the bronze sculptures Spoon Woman (1926; cast 1954) and The Nose (1949; cast 1964). Loans from private and public collections further supplement the exhibition. Other highlights include a group of three sculptures from the late 1950s related to Giacometti’s unrealized project for the Chase Manhattan Bank plaza in New York, a major monument designed for an urban public space. Installed in the museum’s High Gallery, these large-scale works embody three motifs Giacometti explored during last 20 years of his life: standing female nudes, walking male figures, and bust-length portraits of family and friends. The final section of the exhibition, on the museum’s top ramp, presents footage from a film by Ernst Scheidegger, a friend of the artist, showing Giacometti at work in his longtime Paris studio.
A catalogue will be published to accompany Giacometti. Edited by Megan Fontanella and Karole P. B. Vail, Director, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, the volume features essays by Valerie J. Fletcher and Catherine Grenier and graphic design by Gavillet & Cie. A range of programs will be offered in conjunction with Giacometti, with details to be posted at guggenheim.org/calendar.

EXHIBITION SUPPORT


Giacometti is made possible by Lavazza. Additional support is provided by Northern Trust. The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its support, with special thanks to Linda Macklowe, Cochair, as well as Acquavella Galleries, Larry Gagosian, FX and Natasha de Mallmann, Hauser & Wirth, Per Skarstedt, Ulla Dreyfus-Best, Grande Albergo Excelsior Vittoria – Sorrento, kamel mennour, Gigi and Andrea Kracht, La Prairie, Lévy Gorvy, Richard Gray Gallery, Thomas Ammann Fine Art AG, Thomas Gibson Fine Art, and those who wish to remain anonymous. Funding is also provided by Christie’s and the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. It is co-organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and the Fondation Giacometti, Paris.

ABOUT THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION


Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.

ABOUT THE FONDATION GIACOMETTI


The Fondation Giacometti, Paris, is a private institution of public interest recognized by the French state, established in December 2003. Its goal is to preserve, promote, and present the work of Alberto Giacometti. With over 300 sculptures, 90 paintings, and thousands of works on paper, it possesses the richest collection of artworks by the artist in the world: a collection that it is responsible for conserving, restoring, and enriching. The Foundation also has a remarkable collection of photographs and archival materials. A large proportion of this heritage has remained inaccessible to the public since the artist’s death in 1966. In 2014, the Foundation launched a vast exhibition program in France and abroad, designed to reach new audiences. In 2018, it will co-organize a number of major exhibitions of Giacometti’s work, including presentations at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (February 8-May 13, 2018); Beyeler Foundation, Basel (Bacon Giacometti, April 29-September 2, 2018); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (June 8-September 12, 2018); Musée Maillol, Paris (September 14, 2018-January 20, 2019); and Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (October 19, 2018-February 24, 2019).
SPRING 2018 PROGRAMS AT THE GUGGENHEIM
In conjunction with the exhibitions Josef Albers in Mexico and Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away, the Guggenheim Museum presents the following public programs and film series, as well as the thirtieth annual Hilla Rebay Lecture and eighth annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture. 

The Guggenheim, e-flux, and Verso Books Present:
Duty Free Art and Supercommunity U.S. Book Launch
WEDNESDAY JANUARY 24, 6:30 PM
In collaboration with e-flux and Verso Books, the Guggenheim presents the U.S. launch of two recent Verso publications: Hito Steyerl’s Duty Free Art: Art in the Age of Planetary Civil War, a new volume of essays by the writer, filmmaker, and artist; and Supercommunity: Diabolical Togetherness Beyond Contemporary Art, a collection of essays, poems, short stories, and plays by artists and theorists selected from the 88-text issue of e-flux journal commissioned for the 56th Venice Biennale. The evening features Steyerl in conversation with media theorist Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, a presentation by artist and Supercommunity  contributing author Liam Gillick, and a one-act play by coeditors Julieta Aranda and Brian Kuan Wood.

Free, RSVP for updates. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar
Josef Albers in Mexico Programs
Exhibition Tours in Spanish
SUNDAYS, THROUGH MARCH 25, 10:30 AM
Join a conversational gallery tour in Spanish exploring Josef Albers in Mexico as well as other exhibitions throughout the museum. Facilitated by an educator trained in art history and gallery teaching, these tours consider the photographs taken during Albers’s travels to archaeological sites and monuments in Mexico alongside the resulting photocollages and his celebrated geometric, abstract paintings.

Free with admission, no RSVP is required. Meet on the rotunda floor. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Eva Díaz: “Copies Have More Fun” 
TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 6:30 PM 
In conjunction with the exhibition Josef Albers in Mexico, join Eva Díaz, Associate Professor, History of Art and Design, at Pratt Institute, for a lecture on Josef Albers’s artistic and teaching practices. In 2010, seventy-five years after Albers first visited Mexico, artist Jill Magid learned that architect Luis Barragán created and for years displayed two Homage to the Square replicas in his Mexico City home. Magid then used the annotations on the back of Albers’s works to paint her own body of copies modeled on the Homages—though Barragán did not produce his replicas in this way. She went on to show her series, cleverly titled Homage , in Switzerland, building on a controversial body of work about the lack of public access to Barragán’s archives, which are housed on Basel. This talk will discuss how Albers made pedagogical outreach to the viewer a central part of his work, particularly at a time when the educational process was understood as a creative enterprise that impelled personal growth and social transformation. Albers trained his viewers by offering perceptual tests of variation, seriality, and systems in his artwork, as well as by implicitly allowing—in a remarkably nonproprietary way—that viewers might enact their own versions of his works, just as Magid did. The program concludes with an exhibition viewing of Josef Albers in Mexico and reception.

$15, $10 members, free for students with RSVP. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away Programs
The information below is subject to change. Please contact the Press Office to confirm program information prior to publication.
Eye to Eye: Artist-led Tours
TUESDAYS, FEBRUARY 20, 27 AND APRIL 10, 6:30 PM
Part of the Guggenheim’s ongoing Eye to Eye series, these intimate evening programs invite contemporary artists to reflect on themes and artworks in current exhibitions, and draw connections to their own practices. For a special iteration of the program on the occasion of Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away , artists identified by Vo as friends, mentors, and collaborators lead a small group of visitors through the exhibition. Each tour is followed by a reception in the Guggenheim’s iconic rotunda.

Tuesday, February 20: Moyra Davey and Jason Simon 
Tuesday, February 27: Julie Ault
Tuesday, April 10: Rirkrit Tiravanija

$20, $15 members, $10 students. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

Film Series: Danh Vo Selects 
SATURDAYS, MARCH 3–31 
A series of films chosen by the artist to accompany his exhibition, “Danh Vo Selects” takes places on Saturdays during the month of March. Each week, two of the following films will be screened.
ROSETTA (1999), DIR. JEAN-PIERRE DARDENNE AND LUC DARDENNE, 93 MIN. 
MARCH 10 AND 31, 2:30 PM; MARCH 17, 5 PM
This intense vérité drama by Belgian filmmakers and brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne closely follows a poor young woman struggling to hold on to a job that would support her and her alcoholic mother. It is a swift and simple tale made revelatory by the raw, empathic way in which the directors render Rosetta’s desperation, keeping the camera nearly perched on her shoulder throughout.

THE BALLAD OF NARAYAMA (1983), DIR. SHOHEI IMAMURA, 130 MIN. 
MARCH 3 AND 24, 5 PM; MARCH 17, 2:30 PM
Still strong at the age of 69, Orin prepares herself for an inevitable yet horrifying ritual. In her village, where food is scarce, life is harsh and people are desperate and cruel. Anyone who lives for 70 years is hauled to the mountaintop by their children and left to die in the dead of winter. Orin is prepared to accept her fate, but she also has one last, all-important task—she must find a suitable wife for her son, Tatsuhei.

THE EXORCIST (1973), DIR. WILLIAM FRIEDKIN, 122 MIN. 
MARCH 3 AND 24, 2:30 PM; MARCH 10 AND 31, 5 PM
One of the most profitable horror movies ever made and the first example of the genre to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture, this tale of an exorcism is based loosely on reported actual events. It centers on a young girl’s bizarre and distressing behavior, which is identified by a local priest as a demonic possession. The priest makes a request to perform an exorcism, and the church sends in an expert to help with the difficult job.

Screenings take place in the New Media Theater, Level B, and are free with admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/films.
Thirtieth Annual Hilla Rebay Lecture
Irit Rogoff
WEDNESDAY APRIL 4, 6:30 PM
Writer, teacher, curator, and organizer, Irit Rogoff works at the intersection of contemporary art, critical theory, and emergent political manifestations. She is Professor of Visual Culture at Goldsmiths College, University of London, where she heads the Curatorial/Knowledge PhDprogram and the Global Arts MA program. Now in its thirtieth year, the annual Hilla Rebay Lecture series brings distinguished scholars to the Guggenheim Museum to examine significant issues in the theory, criticism, and history of art. This program is followed by a reception.

Free, RSVP for updates. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

The Annual Hilla Rebay Lecture is made by The Hilla von Rebay Foundation.
Eighth Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture
Terry Winters in Conversation with Lisa Phillips
TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 6:30 PM
Join artist Terry Winters as he discusses his practice with Lisa Phillips, Toby Devan Lewis Director of the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York. The program is followed by a reception in the Guggenheim’s iconic rotunda. Winters’s (b. 1949, New York) work has been the subject of surveys at numerous museums, including the Tate Gallery, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Winters was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2013. As director of the New Museum, Phillips initiated the design and construction of its first dedicated freestanding building and cocurated exhibitions on John Waters, Carroll Dunham, and Paul McCarthy. Phillips has presided over surveys of major influential artists such as Richard Prince, Frederick Kiesler, Terry Winters, and Cindy Sherman. She graduated cum laude from Middlebury College and did doctoral work at the Graduate Center at CUNY. She lectures on contemporary art throughout the world and has served as a visiting critic at Yale University.

The Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture honors the wide-ranging career of Robert Rosenblum (1927–2006), former Guggenheim Swid Curator of 20th-Century Art, and Henry Ittleson Professor of Modern European Art, New York University. This program is followed by a reception.

Free, RSVP for updates. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

The Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture series is facilitated by the donors to the Robert Rosenblum Fund who are gratefully acknowledged for their generosity.
Art After Dark
FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 9 PM–MIDNIGHT; EXCLUSIVE MEMBERS' HOUR: 8–9 PM
An after-hours private viewing of current exhibitions including Danh Vo: Take My Breath Awayand Josef Albers in Mexico, featuring a cash bar and live music.

$25, members free. Purchase tickets online in advance or become a member. Cash bar serves wine and beer. Guests will be asked for a photo ID. Limited general admission tickets will go on sale closer to the event date. No tickets are sold at the door. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/artafterdark.

Art After Dark is supported in part by SHOWTIME®.
Mind’s Eye Tours
FEBRUARY 12, MARCH 14, APRIL 9 AND MAY 9
Monthly Mind’s Eye tours and workshops for visitors who are blind or have low vision are conducted by arts and education professionals through verbal description, conversation, sensory experiences, and creative practice. For visitors who wish to visit the museum on their own, the free Guggenheim app includes verbal imaging tours and VoiceOver. Download the app or borrow a device for free with museum admission.

February 12, 6:30–8:30 pm: Love and Art
March 14, 2–4 pm: Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away 
April 9, 6:30–8:30 pm: Permanent collection
May 9, 2–4 pm: Permanent collection

Free with RSVP required one week before the program date. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/mindseye.
Curator’s Eye Tours
WEDNESDAYS, JANUARY 24, MARCH 21, AND APRIL 18, 12 PM
Public gallery tours providing an opportunity for visitors to explore the museum’s exhibitions with the exhibition curator sharing expert knowledge of the work on view. Tours interpreted in American Sign Language (ASL) upon request.

January 24: Josef Albers in Mexico
Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator

March 21: Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away
Susan Thompson, Associate Curator

April 18: Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away
Katherine Brinson, Daskalopoulos Curator, Contemporary Art

Free with museum admission. Limited capacity, advance onsite registration is required. Registration opens one hour before the tour at the Information desk. Check-in begins 15 minutes prior to the start of the tour. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Daily Public Tour
Art in the Round
DAILY AT 2 PM
Art in the Round public tours are led by gallery educators. Specialists in fields of art, art history, and gallery teaching, educators provide informative and meaningful experiences by engaging visitors in a shared process of close looking and conversation, with the occasional surprise. For everyone from first-time visitors to long-term members, these daily tours are invaluable for learning about the collection, special exhibitions, and the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed building. Visitors of all ages and abilities are encouraged and welcome to join.

Free with admission, no RSVP is required. Meet on the rotunda floor. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Major support for Josef Albers in Mexico is provided by LLWW Foundation. Funding is also provided by the Robert Lehman Foundation, the Mex-Am Cultural Foundation, Inc., and The Mexican Cultural Institute of New York. The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its generosity, with special thanks to Alice and Thomas Tisch; David Zwirner, New York/London; Lisa and John Miller; and Louisa Stude Sarofim. The catalogue for this exhibition is supported in part by Furthermore: a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund. 

Funding for Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away is provided by Art Mentor Foundation Lucerne. Additional support is provided by the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Obel Family Foundation, the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation, Beckett-Fonden, and the Danish Arts Foundation.

The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its support, with special thanks to Mara and Marcio Fainziliber, Cochairs; Stefan Edlis and Gael Neeson; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, London, Paris; kurimanzutto, Mexico City; Robert Soros; Faurschou Foundation; Inigo Philbrick and Francisca Mancini; The Pritzker Traubert Foundation; Murray Alexander Abramson; Peter Bentley Brandt; Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York; Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris; Xavier Hufkens; The Jamil Collection; and Naomi Milgron and John Kaldor. The catalogue for this exhibition is supported by the New Carlsberg Foundation. 
The Annual Hilla Rebay Lecture is made possible by The Hilla von Rebay Foundation. 

The Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture series is facilitated by the donors to the Robert Rosenblum Fund who are gratefully acknowledged for their generosity.
 
Public programs are presented by The Sackler Center for Arts Education, a gift of the Mortimer D. Sackler Family. Endowment funding is provided by The Engelberg Foundation, the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, The Elaine Terner Cooper Foundation, and the Esther Simon Charitable Trust.

Educational activities and/or public programs are made possible in part by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, The Edmond de Rothschild Foundation, The Hilla von Rebay Foundation, and The Seth Sprague Educational and Charitable Foundation.
 
Funding is also provided by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; the Windgate Charitable Foundation; the Sidney E. Frank Foundation; Guggenheim Partners, LLC; the Rose M. Badgeley Residuary Charitable Trust; Dorothy and Elihu Modlin; and The Barker Welfare Foundation. 

Additional support from Con Edison; the Gap Foundation; Katherine and Peter Kend; the Jane A. Lehman and Alan G. Lehman Foundation; the Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Inc.; Jamie Johnson and William S. Dutterer; The Robert & Toni Bader Charitable Foundation; the Henry E. Niles Foundation, Inc.; and the Metzger-Price Fund, Inc. is gratefully acknowledged. 

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation thanks the members of the Education Committee for their support. 



Installation view: Josef Albers in Mexico , Nov. 3, 2017—March 28, 2018. Photo: David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 2018

Guggenheim Museum Presents Josef Albers in Mexico

(NEW YORK, NY, November 2, 2017)—From November 3, 2017, through February 18, 2018, the Guggenheim Museum will present Josef Albers in Mexico, an exhibition illuminating the relationship between the forms and design of pre-Columbian monuments and the art of Josef Albers (b. 1888, Bottrop, Germany; d. 1976, New Haven). The presentation will feature a selection of rarely shown early paintings, iconic canvases from Albers’s Homage to the Square and Variant/Adobe series, and works on paper. The exhibition also includes a rich selection of photographs and photocollages, many of which have never before been on view and were created by Albers in response to frequent visits to Mexican archaeological sites beginning in the 1930s. With letters, studies, and unseen personal photographs alongside works drawn from the collections of the Guggenheim Museum and the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Josef Albers in Mexico presents an opportunity to learn about the least known aspect of his practice, photography, offering a new perspective on his most celebrated abstract works.

Josef Albers in Mexico is organized by Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator, Collections, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
An artist, poet, theoretician, and professor of arts and design at the Bauhaus, Dessau and Berlin; Black Mountain College, Asheville, North Carolina; and Yale University, New Haven, Albers worked across the mediums of painting, printmaking, murals, and architecture. With his wife, the artist Anni Albers, he traveled to Mexico and other Latin American countries more than a dozen times from 1935 to 1967 to visit monuments of ancient Mesoamerica, which archaeologists were then excavating amid a resurgence of interest in pre-Columbian art and culture. On each visit, Albers took hundreds of black-and-white photographs of the pyramids, shrines, and sanctuaries at these sites, often grouping multiple images printed at various sizes onto paperboard sheets. The resulting photographs and photocollages reveal Albers’s innovative, if understudied, approach to photography and also underscore the importance of seriality within his overall body of work.
Albers’s collaged images also suggest a nuanced relationship between the geometry and design elements of pre-Columbian monuments and the artist’s iconic abstract canvases and works on paper. Several of the latter are titled after key sites in Mexico, and formal resonances between the two bodies of work become apparent, especially when viewed together as in the Guggenheim presentation. Albers’s embrace of pre-Columbian imagery may be considered within the complex and often-fraught history of modernist artists looking toward non-Western cultures for source material. His work contrasts with that of the revolutionary Mexican artists with whom he met on his trips, including Diego Rivera. At the same time, Albers’s long-term commitment to studying Mexican art and architecture also positions him as a prescient figure in the history of post–World War II American art, when artists such as Donald Judd, Ad Reinhardt, and Robert Smithson looked toward ancient traditions with a new sensitivity and self-awareness.
A fully illustrated catalogue, with scholarly essays by Hinkson and Joaquin Barríendos, accompanies Josef Albers in Mexico. The volume also includes writing by Josef Albers and an illustrated map documenting the Alberses’ journeys. The legacy of education is a strong element of his practice and will be reflected in public programs, such as a November 18 workshop for educators on the color theory he developed within his seminal pedagogical project Interactions of Color (1964).
Major support for Josef Albers in Mexico is provided by LLWW Foundation. Funding is also provided by the Robert Lehman Foundation, the Mex-Am Cultural Foundation Inc., and The Mexican Cultural Institute of New York. The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its generosity, with special thanks to Alice and Thomas Tisch; David Zwirner, New York/London; Lisa and John Miller; and Louisa Stude Sarofim. The catalog for this exhibition is supported by Furthermore: a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund.

ABOUT THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION

Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.

VISITOR INFORMATION

Admission: Adults $25, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. The Guggenheim’s free app, available with admission or by download to personal devices, offers an enhanced visitor experience. The app features content on special exhibitions as well as access to more than 1,600 works in the Guggenheim’s permanent collection. Additionally, information about the museum’s landmark building is available in English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Verbal Description guides for select exhibitions are also included for visitors who are blind or have low vision. The Guggenheim app is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.
Museum Hours: Sun–Wed, 10 am–5:45 pm; Fri, 10 am–5:45 pm; Sat, 10 am–7:45 pm; closed Thurs. On Saturdays, beginning at 5:45 pm, the museum hosts Pay What You Wish. For general information, call 212 423 3500 or visit the museum online at: guggenheim.org

AN EXHIBIT OF SILK ROAD ART TREASURES FROM DUNHUANG CAVES COMING TO BRYANT SEPT. 27-OCT. 6
For ten days this fall, Bryant University will use virtual reality and painstakingly reconstructed replicas to bring an ancient Chinese cave and its artistic treasures to campus. 
The exhibition, Dunhuang: An Oasis for East-West Cultural, Commercial, and Religious Exchanges Along the Ancient Silk Road opens Sept. 27 in the George E. Bello Center for Information and Technology. Bryant is the first academic institution in the United States to host this interactive exhibition. After its 10-day run at Bryant, the exhibition will travel to other U.S. colleges and universities, including the University of Maryland, University of New Hampshire, and West Virginia University.  When the U.S. tour concludes, portions of the exhibit will be donated to Bryant for permanent display. 
Overview 
Opening ceremonies will take place September 27, and from September 28-October 6, guided tours will take visitors through the exhibition — a panoramic projection of the cave site — and into the reconstructed cave to inspect the splendid murals and statues in close range. The interactive exhibit also includes virtual reality, digital imaging, and short movies. Events related to the exhibition include a series of seminars focusing on arts, culture, history, environment, and religions represented in these caves.
“We are excited to bring this exceptional exhibition to Bryant after a year of planning and preparation,” said Hong Yang, Ph.D., Vice President of International Affairs and Dr. Charles J. Smiley Chair Professor of Science and Technology. “People will be able to experience something they’d otherwise have to travel thousands of miles to a Chinese desert to see. It is truly a unique cultural opportunity, and we look forward to sharing it with the Bryant community as well as other universities, organizations, and individuals throughout the country.”
About Dunhuang
Dunhuang is an oasis located in China’s northwestern Gansu Province, more than 1,400 miles from Beijing. According to Dunhuang Academy, it was the main and only gateway to and from China on the route known as the ancient Silk Road that ran between China, Western Asia, and the sub-continent of India. For more than 1,000 years, from the 4th to 14th centuries, Dunhuang was an ancient “cultural melting pot” where different cultures and religions met, traded, and interacted. Over the centuries, it became customary for travelers to dig caves into the sides of mountains and decorate them with art, with the hope for safety and success on their long and often dangerous journeys.
The Mogao Caves at Dunhuang house one of the world’s most extensive sites of Buddhist art, containing ancient Buddhist murals, statues, silk, manuscripts, as well as arts from Islamic, Daoist, Greek, Christian, and other cultures and religions. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a replica of Cave 285 of the Mogao Caves, a visually rich 6th-century cave known for its exceptional collection of Buddhist artworks. Due to environmental and political changes these caves were buried in the sands until rediscovered a hundred years ago. It is now a world renewed culture heritage listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The Dunhuang exhibition at Bryant University is made possible by a partnership between Bryant University and Dunhuang Academy and co-sponsored by the Confucius Institute Headquarters and Government of Gansu Province.
Exhibition highlights


The Great Bridge: Matter and Memory of the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge

Saturday, September 96:00-7:30PM
Refreshments will be served at 5:30-6:00 pm

Event fee: Free Admission
40 Rector Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10006




Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge is one of the most significant cultural emblems of China in the 1960s-70s. Being regarded as both a political victory and a technological achievement, the Great Bridge became a popular icon that entered people's everyday lives nationwide. In this lecture, Professor Andong Lu will introduce the 'Memory Project of the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge', a research on collective memory and a bottom-up urban regeneration project, and interpret the artefacts and memories of the Great Bridge from a historical perspective to reveal this unprecedented landscape of collective memory. Professor Andong Lu completed his PhD at the University of Cambridge and was elected a Fellow of Wolfson College. He is now Professor at the School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Nanjing University. He initiated the Memory Project of the Grand Bridge together with a group of scholars and volunteers, intending to revitalize the memories of the bridge and to create a contemporary place of memory. Prof. Lu was extensively quoted in a recent CNN report "How the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge changed China forever" 

This Lecture will be conducted in Chinese, with no interpretation. Free, but advance registration is required.

Follow Renwen's WeChat: chineselectures

MYSTICAL SYMBOLISM PROGRAM

Vexations
Tuesday, September 26, 7 pm–Wednesday, September 27, 1 pm

This durational concert presents Erik Satie’s Vexations (1893), featuring a roster of established and emerging pianists from both classical and avant-garde spheres, including Timo Andres, Philip Corner, Sylvie Courvoisier, Karl Larson, Anne Queffélec, Joshua Rifkin, and Margaret Leng Tan. Satie composed this iconic piece on the heels of ending his involvement with the Salon de la Rose+Croix. It is unknown whether Satie intended for the work to be played or if it was simply a sort of jest directed at the esoteric excesses of Joséphin Péladan, the founder of the Salon. But the unlikely piece attracted the attention of John Cage, who first staged it. Cage organized a concert in New York in 1963 featuring contemporary musicians such as John Cale, James Tenney, David Tudor, and Christian Wolff, among others. In observance of one of Satie’s instructions, the score was repeated 840 times, lasting for almost 19 hours in an unprecedented serial undertaking that echoed the Minimalist and Conceptual concerns of the 1960s. More than 50 years later, the Guggenheim will once again present Vexations to a New York audience. A full list of performers and schedule will be announced in September.
$15 (includes after-hours viewing of Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897), $12 members, $10 students during after-hours portion of the program. Free with admission during museum hours on Wednesday, September 27. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
This program is supported in part by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy and the Consulate General of Switzerland, New York.
Furniture in Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897 courtesy of Roche Bobois. Additional support provided by the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia.

ART AND CHINA AFTER 1989: THEATER OF THE WORLD PROGRAMS

“Turn It On: China on Film, 2000–2017”
Fridays and Saturdays, October 13–December 16, Daytime Screenings Vary, Evening Screenings at 6:30 pm

Cocurated by Ai Weiwei and Wang Fen, this series presents 20 independent documentaries by China’s most daring artists and filmmakers investigating the political, social, economic, and cultural conditions of contemporary China. This 10-week festival encompasses twice-weekly daytime screenings and three featured evening events, and is presented concurrently with the exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, on view October 6, 2017–January 7, 2018.
Daytime screenings take place in the New Media Theater and are free with museum admission. Evening screenings at 6:30 pm include a Q&A session with filmmakers and require a ticket. $20, $15 members, $10 students. For the full schedule, visit guggenheim.org/turniton.

Nightingale, Not the Only Voice 夜莺不是唯一的歌喉, 2000
Directed by Tang Danhong 唐丹鸿
Mandarin with English subtitles, 180 min.
Friday, October 13, 6:30 pm

Nightingale, Not the Only Voice follows the lives of three artists, including the film’s director, on their shared journey through real and psychological oppression to self-discovery. Tang Danhong examines her past—particularly her relationship with her parents—and looks at the painful, formative moments that inform her current psychological state, her life, and her art.
A Q&A with Tang Danhong, moderated by Chip Rolley, Senior Director of Literary Programs, PEN America, follows the screening.

We the Workers 凶年之畔, 2017
Directed by Huang Wenhai 黄文海
Mandarin with English subtitles, 173 min.
Friday, November 3, 6:30 pm

For over 30 years, China has been swept up in rapid capitalist development. The “China miracle” has been built on the backs of hundreds of millions of migrant laborers. This film features workers from different provinces spanning two generations who have resisted this force through activist struggle and action.
A Q&A with Huang Wenhai, moderated by Suzanne Nossel, Executive Director, PEN America, follows the screening.

Fairytale 童话, 2007
Directed by Ai Weiwei 艾未未
Mandarin with English subtitles, 153 min.
Friday, December 15, 6:30 pm

In 2007 Ai Weiwei took part in Documenta 12 with a participatory event called Fairytale, after the Brothers Grimm who were born in Kassel, the German city that hosts the famed art exhibition. Ai invited 1,001 people from China, many of whom had never been abroad before, to travel to Germany, live in a dormitory of Ai’s design, and freely wander the city and the exhibition. Ai’s studio recruited the applicants from the Internet. He also sent 1,001 Ming period–style wooden chairs, which were arranged throughout the exhibition hall as gathering spaces. The film opens with the project’s inception and takes us through its full enactment, recording the experiences of participants of all backgrounds to create a series of portraits woven together by a single event.
Includes a Q&A (speakers to be announced).
Organized by the Guggenheim Museum in conjunction with Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World. Presented in collaboration with PEN America. Support is provided by The Hayden Family Foundation.

The Chinese Lives of Uli Sigg, 2016
Directed by Michael Schindhelm
93 min., Courtesy Icarus Films
Friday, January 5, 6:30 pm

Ai Weiwei credits him with launching his international career. Renowned pianist Lang Lang describes him as a mentor to Chinese artists. Chinese art curator Victoria Lu says his influence has been felt around the world. When Swiss businessman Uli Sigg first went to China, art was far from his mind. But once he began to seek out contemporary artists, it changed his life, theirs, and the international art scene for generations to come. The Chinese Lives of Uli Sigg, directed by art historian Michael Schindhelm and produced by Marcel Hoehn, is a history of China’s opening to the West through the eyes of Sigg and the dazzling array of contemporary Chinese artists he championed. Luminaries including Ai, Cao Chong’en, Cao Fei, Feng Mengbo, Gang Lijun, Shao Fan, Wang Guangyi, and Zeng Fanzhi are interviewed along with curators, diplomats, architects, and business colleagues in this colorful documentary of contemporary Chinese art. The screening is followed by a reception and exhibition viewing.
$15, $10 members, $5 students. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its generous support, with special thanks to Cochairs Thomas and Lynn Ou and Liam Wee Tay and Cindy Chua-Tay, Trustee, as well as Karen Lo, Sophia Ma, Jane Yong, Rachel and Jean-Pierre Lehmann, Yasko Tashiro Porté and Thierry Porté, Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang, Jane Q. Zhao, and those who wish to remain anonymous. Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Major support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation. Funding is also provided by the W.L.S. Spencer Foundation, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, The Nancy Foss Heath and Richard B. Heath Educational, Cultural and Environmental Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

ARCHTOBER

In conjunction with Archtober—New York City’s monthlong celebration of architecture and design—and the 20th anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Guggenheim Museum presents a suite of workshops, tours, and public programs that provide an up-close look at Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic design. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/archtober.

Saturday Sketching
Saturdays, October 7–28, 10 am–4 pm              

Drawing materials and prompts are available in the rotunda on a drop-in basis for visitors. Study Frank Lloyd Wright’s design and develop a deeper understanding of the Guggenheim museum’s architecture.
Free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/archtober.

Art in the Round Public Tours
Saturdays, October 7–28, 2 pm

Free tours with a special focus on the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed building. Specialists in art history and gallery teaching lead these informative and engaging experiences for visitors of all ages and abilities.
Free with museum admission (meet in the rotunda, no registration required). For more information, visit guggenheim.org/archtober.

After-Hours Architecture Tour
Wednesday, October 11, 6 pm

A unique chance to join a small-group tour of the museum after it closes to the public. Ashley Mendelsohn, Curatorial Assistant of Architecture and Digital Initiatives, gives an in-depth look at the iconic Wright-designed building and its history.
$45, $40 members. Registration required. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/archtober.

Drawing the Guggenheim: New York, Venice, Bilbao
Sunday, October 15, 10 am–4 pm

In a collaboration among sister museums Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, visitors to all museums on Sunday, October 15, have the opportunity to explore and sketch the buildings’ iconic architecture through a variety of public programs, tours, and workshops. Online, museum visitors can share their work and view drawings from around the world using #DrawingtheGugg.
New York events include:
  • Drawing the Guggenheim (10 am–1 pm): A workshop that uses drawing to study Frank Lloyd Wright’s design for the Guggenheim. After a short classroom presentation and guided tour, participants draw from various perspectives in the museum and then reflect on their discoveries together. No prior drawing experience is required. $25 per person (includes materials). Registration required.
  • Family Architecture Tour (10:30 am‐12 pm): A family-friendly exploration of the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed building. For families with children ages 8 and up. $30 per family, $15 members (includes admission). Registration required.
  • Open Studio (1–4 pm): Drop-in architecture-focused projects in the Studio Art Lab. For families with children ages 3 and up. Free with museum admission, no registration required.
  • Art in the Round (2 pm): An architecture-focused public tour for visitors of all ages. Free with museum admission, no registration required.
  • Drop-in Sketching (10 am–4 pm): Drawing prompts and materials for all visitors will be available throughout the museum for self-directed exploration. Free with admission, no registration required.
  • Film Screenings (11 am and 3:30 pm): In Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum(2010), 85 min., architectural historian Neil Levine leads viewers through an engaging and personal tour of the building and its history. Screenings are free with museum admission and take place in the New Media Theater.
For more information, visit guggenheim.org/archtober.

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao 20th Anniversary

This October, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao celebrates its milestone 20th anniversary as a catalyst for art and culture in Spain’s Basque Country. In the two decades since its opening, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao has staged over 160 exhibitions of modern and contemporary art, and welcomes more than 1 million visitors annually. Special events around the anniversary include “Reflections,” a large-scale video projection on the iconic building’s facade, hosted on the evenings of October 11–14. The Guggenheim Museum in New York joins the celebration with new blog and video content on guggenheim.org and photos from anniversary celebrations shared on social media channels.
For more information and details on events and exhibitions in Bilbao, visit xx.guggenheim-bilbao.eus/en/.

MIDDLE EASTERN CIRCLE PRESENTS

An Evening with Slavs and Tatars
Wednesday, November 1, 6:30 pm

Artist collective Slavs and Tatars presents the New York premiere of I Utter Other (2014–present), a lecture-performance addressing the legacy of Orientalism in the Russian and Soviet context. Weaving together scholarship, satire, and comedy, I Utter Other looks to Edward Said’s seminal masterpiece Orientalism (1978) and asks what it means when one East looks to another East. Slavs and Tatars make visible the myriad assumptions that accompany public communication, translation, and historical remembering, especially as pertains to their ongoing research into the fluid geographies that lie between the former Berlin Wall and the Great Wall of China.
$15, $10 members, free for students with RSVP. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Funding is provided by members of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s Middle Eastern Circle.

ACADEMY OF AMERICAN POETS’ ANNUAL BLANEY LECTURE

An Evening with Claudia Rankine
Thursday, November 30, 6:30 pm

MacArthur “Genuis,” Academy of American Poets Chancellor, and best-selling poet Claudia Rankine delivers a talk on contemporary poetry and poetics, followed by a reception and book sale and signing in the Guggenheim’s famed Frank Lloyd Wright–designed rotunda. Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including Citizen: An American Lyric (2014), winner of the 2014 National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry and the 2016 Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt Book Prize for Poetry, among other distinctions, and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely: An American Lyric (2004). She has written two plays and edited several anthologies including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind (2015). Rankine is currently the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry at Yale University in the departments of African American Studies and English. The Blaney Lecture, offered annually by a prominent poet, was created in memory of former Academy of American Poets board member Dr. Dorothy Gulbenkian Blaney by a gift from her estate. This event is copresented by the Academy of American Poets and the Guggenheim Museum.
$30, $25 Guggenheim and Academy of American Poets members, $15 students. Members’ presale ticketing begins August 30. General admission tickets go on sale September 1. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

ART AFTER DARK

Art After Dark: Halloween
Friday, October 27, 9 pm–Midnight; Exclusive Members’ Hour: 8–9 pm

A special Halloween-themed iteration of the Guggenheim’s popular after-hours series Art After Dark. The event will feature a private viewing of the exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, a cash bar, and live DJ performance.
$65, $40 members. Limited tickets will go on sale in September. Cash bar serves wine and beer. Guests will be asked for a photo ID. No tickets are sold at the door.

Art After Dark
Friday, December 1, 9 pm–Midnight; Exclusive Members’ Hour: 8–9 pm

An after-hours private viewing of current exhibitions including Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World and Josef Albers in Mexico, featuring a cash bar and live musical entertainment.
$25, members free. Purchase tickets online in advance or become a member. Cash bar serves wine and beer. Guests will be asked for a photo ID. Limited general admission tickets will go on sale closer to the event date. No tickets are sold at the door.
Art After Dark is supported in part by SHOWTIME®.

MIND’S EYE TOURS

Select Mondays, 6:30 pm, and Wednesdays, 2 pm

For visitors who are blind or have low vision, tours and workshops focused on the Guggenheim’s exhibitions are presented through verbal description, conversation, and sensory methods.
September 13, 2–4 pm: Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892-1897
November 1, 2–4 pm: Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World
December 11, 6:30–8:30 pm: Holiday Gathering
Free, RSVP required. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/mindseye.

CURATOR’S EYE AND CONSERVATOR’S EYE TOURS

Wednesdays, 12 pm

Public gallery tours led by exhibition curators.
August 23: Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892-1897
Vivien Greene, Senior Curator, 19th-and Early 20th-Century Art
October 11: Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World
Philip Tinari, Director, Ullens Center for Contemporary Art and Guest Cocurator
November 15: Art and China after 1989: Theater of the WorldAlexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Art, and Senior Advisor, Global Arts

Free with museum admission. Tours interpreted in American Sign Language (ASL) upon request. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

Boston Children’s Museum to Host Boston’s Second Annual Maker Faire 
September 17, 2017 Boston Celebrates the Maker Movement
BOSTON, MA – August 22, 2017 – Boston Children’s Museum announced that in collaboration with Maker Media, WBZ-TV/CBS Boston, Boston Public Schools and the City of Boston it will host the second annual Boston Mini Maker Faire event on Sunday, September 17, 2017.  The Boston Mini Maker Faire will be held inside and outside the Museum on Fort Point Channel. 
The Maker Faire is an exuberant celebration of the innovation and creativity that radiates across Boston and its surrounding communities. Part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new, Maker Faire is an all-ages celebration of creative ingenuity in all its forms. It is an opportunity for the creative doers that make Boston an international leader in innovation to share their work and inspire the next generation of visionaries to go out and change the world. 
The Boston Mini Maker Faire brings together Boston’s technology innovators, designers, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, artists, crafters, students, and more, and introduces them to the thousands of adults and children that attend the event. All of these “makers” come to the Boston Mini Maker Faire to show what they create with their bare hands and bold minds, and to share how they do it, why they do it, and what they learn. The Boston Mini Maker Faire is an event that inspires children and adults to think creatively and innovatively and to connect with people and projects in their own communities.
 
The maker movement, inspired by the desire to create and invent, and enabled by new tools such as 3D software and printers, desktop machine tools, laser cutters, electronics kits, and the growth of shared spaces where makers can access more advanced fabrication tools, is nurturing a new wave of hands-on innovation and entrepreneurship. The maker movement celebrates learning through doing, and the spirit of sharing.
Maker Faire sponsors, who help make the event possible, include AutodeskBose CorporationMathWorksNational GridSkyworks Solutions, Inc.UltimakerVelcro CompaniesVertex and Senator William "Mo" Cowan and Mrs. Stacy L. Cowan. With the support of these and other sponsors, the Museum has been able to expand the Faire in year two, and inspire an even wider range of families, educators, kids of all ages, and anyone who likes to tinker, imagine, and create. Corporations interested in Maker Faire sponsorships should visithttp://boston.makerfaire.com/become-a-sponsor/
The Museum invites local makers to showcase their ingenuity and creativity at the Maker Faire event. Interested makers can apply to host a booth at the event by emailing contact@makerfaireboston.com
“Today’s young Makers are tomorrow’s innovators, engineers, artists, and creative thinkers. The Boston Mini Maker Faire is a marketplace of possibilities for these future leaders,” said Carole Charnow President & CEO. “It is an event where children and adults alike are exposed to the amazing, the ingenious, and the captivating; and where anyone can shop around for creative endeavors they may not have thought possible.”
Maker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth—a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.  Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers.  They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.
The original Maker Faire event was held in San Mateo, CA and in 2017 celebrated its twelfth annual show with some 1200 makers and 125,000 people in attendance.  World Maker Faire New York, the other flagship event, has grown in six years to 900+ makers and 95,000 attendees. Forty larger scale Maker Faires occur in cities around the world—Berlin, Paris, Rome, Tokyo, and Shenzhen to name a few—and over 170 community-driven, independently organized Mini Maker Faires are now being produced in the United States and 40 other countries around the world.
“Boston has so many world-class educational institutions and a wide breadth of maker spaces—it's an ideal context for a Maker Faire," said Sabrina Merlo, Maker Media Program Director.  “We are delighted to have Boston Children’s Museum as a partner, and are excited this year to see the Faire grow and turn out and celebrate more of the talented and diverse Boston maker community.” 
The Boston Mini Maker Faire is being led by Boston Children's Museum and an advisory board of leaders from local Maker organizations, including Artisan’s Asylum, The Eliot School, Roxbury Innovation Center, Boston Makers, Einstein’s Workshop, Olin College, Artists for Humanity, and NuVu Studio. Last year’s Faire in Boston was the city’s first, with 80 makers and thousands of visitors attending. The 2017 edition will build on that success and will host more makers and welcome even more visitors.
Admission to the Mini Maker Faire will be $20 per person, which includes indoor and outdoor activities. The cost to Museum members is $10. Given the nature of this special event, typical Museum discounts will not apply. Please also note that not all indoor Museum exhibits will be open during the event.  To purchase tickets in advance for the Mini Maker Faire http://bit.ly/2uP0tcs
Boston Mini Maker Faire is independently organized by Boston Children’s Museum and operated under license from Maker Media, Inc. 
For additional information visit http://boston.makerfaire.com/ and BostonChildrensMuseum.org

Guggenheim Museum Schedule of Exhibitions Through 2019



















The information below is subject to change. Please contact the Press Office to confirm exhibition dates prior to publication.

FINAL WEEKS

ON VIEW

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World

October 6–January 7, 2018


A fresh interpretative survey of Chinese experimental art framed by the geopolitical dynamics resulting from the end of the Cold War, the spread of globalization, and the rise of China. Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, the largest exhibition of its kind ever in North America, looks at a bold contemporary art movement that anticipated, chronicled, and agitated for the sweeping social transformation that has brought China to the center of the global conversation. With a concentration on the conceptualist art practices of two generations of artists, this exhibition examines how Chinese artists have been both agents and skeptics of China’s emergence as a global presence and places their experiments firmly in an international art-historical context. Occupying the Guggenheim’s rotunda and two Tower Galleries, Art and China after 1989 highlights the artistic achievements of 71 artists and collectives, and features nearly 150 iconic and lesser-known works on loan from private and public collections across Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the United States. Divided into six chronological and thematic sections, the exhibition showcases works in experimental mediums including film and video, ink, installation, and Land art, as well as painting, sculpture, photography, performance, and socially engaged participatory art and activism. Archival materials documenting and contextualizing key moments and movements in this contested history are also interwoven throughout the exhibition. Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World is organized by Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Art, and Senior Advisor, Global Arts, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and guest cocurators Philip Tinari, Director of the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing, and Hou Hanru, Artistic Director of MAXXI, National Museum of 21st Century Arts, Rome. Xiaorui Zhu-Nowell, Research Associate and Curatorial Assistant, Asian Art, and Kyung An, Assistant Curator, Asian Art, Guggenheim Museum, have provided organizational support. Archival research has been developed in collaboration with Asia Art Archives, Hong Kong. The curators are working with an international advisory committee that has met under the auspices of the China Academy of Art, Hangzhou, and the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing.
The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its generous support, with special thanks to Cochairs Thomas and Lynn Ou and Liam Wee Tay and Cindy Chua-Tay, Trustee, as well as Karen Lo, Sophia Ma, Jane Yong, Rachel and Jean-Pierre Lehmann, Yasko Tashiro Porté and Thierry Porté, Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang, Jane Q. Zhao, and those who wish to remain anonymous. Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Major support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation. Funding is also provided by the W.L.S. Spencer Foundation, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, The Nancy Foss Heath and Richard B. Heath Educational, Cultural and Environmental Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

Josef Albers in Mexico

November 3, 2017–February 18, 2018


On his first trip to Mexico, in 1935, Josef Albers (1888–1976) encountered the magnificent architecture of ancient Mesoamerica. He later remarked in a letter to Vasily Kandinsky, a former colleague at the Bauhaus, “Mexico is truly the promised land of abstract art.” With his wife, artist Anni Albers (1899–1994), Josef Albers made nearly a dozen trips to Latin America from 1935 through 1967, touring numerous archeological sites and monuments, especially in Mexico and Peru. He took hundreds of black-and-white photographs of the pyramids, shrines, and sanctuaries at these sites, many of which he later assembled, printed at various scales, into groups on 8-by-10 inch sheets. Albers’s innovative approach to photography remains an underappreciated aspect of his career. This exhibition brings together his photographs and photo collages from the Guggenheim’s collection and various lenders. These works, many of which have never been exhibited publicly, suggest a nuanced relationship between the forms and motifs of pre-Columbian monuments and the artist’s iconic abstract canvases. Albers’s experiences in Mexico offer an essential context for understanding his paintings and prints, particularly from his Homage to the Square and Variant/Adobe series, examples of which are featured in this show. Josef Albers in Mexico is organized by Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator, Collections.
Major support for Josef Albers in Mexico is provided by the LLWW Foundation. Funding is also provided by the Robert Lehman Foundation, David Zwirner, New York/London, and Louisa Stude Sarofim. The catalogue for this exhibition is supported by Furthermore: a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund.

Danh Vo

February 9–May 9, 2018


The first comprehensive survey in the United States of work by Danish artist Danh Vo (b. 1975, Bà Ria, Vietnam) will fill the ramps of the Guggenheim’s rotunda, offering an illuminating overview of Vo’s production from the past 15 years, including a number of new projects created on the occasion of the exhibition. Vo’s installations dissect the power structures, cultural forces, and private desires that shape our experience of the world. His work addresses themes of religion, colonialism, capitalism, and artistic authorship, but refracts these sweeping subjects through intimate personal narratives—what the artist calls “the tiny diasporas of a person’s life.” Each project grows out of a period of intense research in which historical study, fortuitous encounters, and personal relationships are woven into psychologically potent tableaux. Subjected to Vo’s vivid processes of deconstruction and recombination, found objects become registers of latent histories and sociopolitical fissures, frequently charged by knowledge of their former ownership or their status as historical bystanders. Whether presenting the intimate possessions of his family members, a series of thank-you notes from Henry Kissinger, or the chandeliers that glittered above the signing of the treaty that ended the Vietnam War, Vo subtly excavates the internal contradictions and veiled tensions embedded in his material. Ranging the full spectrum of the artist’s oeuvre—from early conceptual works such as The Marriage Project (2003–05), in which he married and divorced acquaintances in order to add their surnames to his own, to his recent sculptural hybrids of classical and Christian statuary—the exhibition will interweave installations, photographs, and works on paper from various points in his career to amplify their thematic resonances. This exhibition is organized by Katherine Brinson, Daskalopoulos Curator, Contemporary Art, with Susan Thompson, Assistant Curator.
Funding for this exhibition is provided by the Art Mentor Foundation Lucerne. Additional support is provided by the the Obel Family Foundation, Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation, and the Danish Arts Foundation. The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its support. The catalogue for this exhibition is supported by the New Carlsberg Foundation.

The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative
Third and final commission and exhibition

May 4–October 21, 2018


The third and final exhibition of The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative will present new commissions by artists born in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, or Macao. Launched in 2013, the initiative engages artists, scholars, and curators from around the world to bring intersecting regional and global conversations and contemporary practices to the fore. Through the selection of key artists, practices, and issues arising from across Greater China, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative strengthens the Guggenheim’s collegial network among the Chinese art community and expands the discourse and investigation of contemporary art today. The first exhibition of the initiative, Wang Jianwei: Time Temple (2014–15), featured a sculptural installation, paintings, a film, and a performance by Wang Jianwei, one of China’s leading conceptual artists. The most recent presentation, Tales of Our Time(2016–17), was a group exhibition that included a robot-operated installation of monumental scale, a public tea gathering in an indoor garden setting, and immersive video works to explore and challenge the notion of place. All works created through the initiative will form The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection at the Guggenheim. The exhibition is organized by Xiaoyu Weng, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art, and Hou Hanru, Consulting Curator, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation. Kyung An, Assistant Curator, Asian Art, provides curatorial support.
This exhibition is made possible by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation.

Giacometti

June 8–September 16, 2018


This comprehensive exhibition features more than 175 sculptures, paintings, and drawings by the Swiss artist Alberto Giacometti (1901–1966), in the first major museum presentation of the artist’s work in the United States in fifteen years. In 1955, more than 60 years ago, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum organized the first-ever museum presentation of Giacometti’s work in its former temporary quarters on New York’s Fifth Avenue and brought key works into its collection. A posthumous retrospective followed in the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed rotunda in 1974. The upcoming exhibition, co-organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and The Fondation Alberto and Annette Giacometti, examines anew this preeminent modernist who may be best known for his distinctive figurative sculptures that emerged after the trauma and anguish of World War II, including a series of elongated standing women, striding men, and expressive busts. Yet Giacometti’s rich career—spent largely working and living in France—spans several decades and various mediums, and his early production reveals his engagement with Cubism and Surrealism as well as African, Oceanic, and Cycladic art. Giacometti’s paintings and drawings, moreover, reflect his incessant investigations of the human body in sculpture, as he strove to capture the essence of humanity. A number of pocket-sized figures and heads begun immediately before the war years, for example, explore spatial concerns such as perspective and distance that became paramount to his work. Giacometti’s studio practice will likewise be a particular focus of the exhibition, examined through the inclusion of rarely exhibited plaster sculptures, in addition to ephemera and historical photographs documenting his relationship with the Guggenheim and with New York. Giacometti is curated by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and Catherine Grenier, Director, The Fondation Giacometti.
This exhibition is made possible by Lavazza. The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Hilma af Klint

October 19, 2018–February 3, 2019


In fall 2018, the Guggenheim Museum will present the first major solo exhibition in the United States of the work of pioneering artist Hilma af Klint (1862–1944), a long under-recognized innovator of abstract art. Af Klint had begun producing nonobjective paintings by 1906, significantly before Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian, and others widely considered trailblazers of the movement to free artwork of representational content. The bold color palettes and expansive formats af Klint frequently used were also like little else that had been seen before. Despite her prescience, af Klint was not well known during her lifetime or the decades following her death. Though she showed her portraits and landscapes, which were rendered in a deft academic style, she produced her more groundbreaking works as part of her spiritual practice. She hoped to install many of them in a spiral-shaped temple, but the building never came to fruition, and the works remained largely unseen. In her turn to abstraction, af Klint engaged many of the same cultural currents that came to inform the work of her better-known peers, including theosophy and anthroposophy, spiritualism, and major scientific discoveries of the period, such as evolution and atomic theory. When af Klint died in 1944, she stipulated that her work not be shown for another 20 years; she believed the world was not yet ready to understand her radically forward-looking compositions. Only over the past three decades have her paintings and works on paper begun to gain widespread attention. This presentation, organized by Tracey Bashkoff, Senior Curator, Collections and Exhibitions, will offer the opportunity to experience af Klint’s work in depth and gain insight into her unique artistic practice and singular historic achievements. In conjunction with the exhibition, the museum will feature a presentation of work by other artists highlighting resonances with af Klint’s output and practice.

Fernand Léger: The Last Decades

June–September 2019


This exhibition will present a renewed examination of this French artist’s late career, when his observations of city dwellers and the human form in action inspired a significant body of work organized by theme. Léger was among the few French artists of his generation to visit the United States. He first traveled to New York and Chicago in 1931, returned to attend his retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in 1935, and, in 1938, spent several months here when he was commissioned by Nelson Rockefeller to decorate his apartment and several homes designed by architect Wallace K. Harrison. With the advent of WWII, Léger chose to wait out his exile in the United States. He taught and lectured across the country, exploring the diversity of its people and achievements. These observations yielded an entirely new approach to his painting, beginning in 1940, which marked his obsession with volume and monumentality and greater transparency of color. During his time in America, his subject matter encompassed a rich series of motifs in such works as Divers, Cyclists, Acrobats and Musicians and Country Outings. Returning to France in late 1945, Léger continued to record contemporary life in his Builders series and in chronicling the leisure activities of the working class, culminating in his masterpiece, the mural-sized Great Parade (1954), which was painted the year before the artist’s death and is a hallmark of the Guggenheim’s collection. Motivated in part by his political engagement with social issues and an unwavering humanist support of the travails of the common man, Léger stands as a defining force in modern art. Fernand Léger: The Last Decades is organized by Susan Davidson, Senior Curator, Collections and Exhibitions.

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao 20th Anniversary


This year, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao celebrates its milestone 20th Anniversary as a catalyst for art and culture in Spain’s Basque Country. In the two decades since its opening, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao has staged more than 160 exhibitions of modern and contemporary art, and it today welcomes over 1 million visitors annually. Special events around the anniversary include Reflections, a large-scale video projection on the iconic building’s facade, hosted on the evenings of October 11–14. The Guggenheim Museum in New York joins the celebration with new blog and video content on guggenheim.org and photos from anniversary celebrations shared on social media channels. For more information and details on events and exhibitions in Bilbao, visit xx.guggenheim-bilbao.eus/en.
For the full schedule of exhibitions through 2018 at Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, please visit https://www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus/en/exhibitions/.

Peggy Guggenheim Collection


For the full schedule of exhibitions through 2018 at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, please visit http://www.guggenheim-venice.it/inglese/exhibitions/mostre.php

VISITOR INFORMATION


Admission: Adults $25, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. Available with admission or by download to personal devices, the Guggenheim’s free app offers an enhanced visitor experience. The app features content on special exhibitions, access to more than 1,600 works in the Guggenheim’s permanent collection, and information about the museum’s landmark building. Verbal imaging guides for select exhibitions are also included for visitors who are blind or have low vision. The Guggenheim app is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.
Museum Hours: Sun–Wed 10 am–5:45 pm, Tues 10 am–9 pm from June 20 to Aug 29, Fri 10 am–5:45 pm, Sat 10 am–7:45 pm, closed Thurs. On Saturdays, beginning at 5:45 pm, the museum hosts Pay What You Wish. For general information, call 212 423 3500 or visit the museum online at: guggenheim.org

School of Chinese Studies

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Gallery Exhibitions

Arts & Culture Programs








Spotlight: 
Announcing Fall at China Institute

There is no better time to learn than this Fall at China Institute. We've broadened our Kids & Teens class offerings to now include Mandarin Munchkins for children 18 months to 2.5 years. We've added a Study Hall for students who are seeking help with their Chinese lessons and homework. And our Fall after-school program is as robust as ever, offering Chinese Language classes at all levels of proficiency. Plus, it's not too soon to start prepping for AP & SAT exams.

For Adult life-long learners, Classical Chinese IV: A Rare Linguistic Gem, taught by Ben Wang, China Institute Senior Lecturer, offers an inspiring and joyful language-study experience that acquaints students with the heights of Chinese culture. Reading Modern Chinese Literature is a 'must' course for any advanced student seeking to learn through prose about China's modern era. For those that are college bound or interested in pursuing a career utilizing their Mandarin, we also offer a new HSK Test Prep program.

Not ready for Fall? August still has lots going on at China Institute. Our Immersive Summer Day Camp for Kids and Teens offers your child the opportunity to learn, play and have fun! Stay cool and see a Film! Our Center for Arts & Culture is co-presenting some great Chinese Films as part of Lincoln Center's Asian American International Film Festival.

And for those art, culture and history lovers, come experience the Han Dynasty right here in Lower Manhattan! Only a handful (9!) extraordinary head to toe jade suits that promised immortality to the Chinese royals and dignitaries have ever been excavated complete, and the most spectacular one is on view at China Institute Gallery. Be sure to visit Dreams of the Kings: A Jade Suit for Eternity, Treasures of the Han Dynasty from Xuzhou. to see for yourself how the imperials treated death as life, and witness the most magnificent gold thread sewn jade burial suit ever excavated.




Fall Classes Registration Open Now!

Receive up to $50 off tuition byAugust 15! Fall Semester StartsSeptember 25









New! Reading Modern Chinese Literature

Thursdays

September 28 - December 7

6:30-8:30PM


Designed for advanced readers, this course will introduce the most influential authors and their works in the history of modern Chinese literature. 




Instructor: Steve Zhang, Senior Instructor of Language & Literature at China Institute  






Fall Special Course: Classical Chinese IV: A Rare Linguistic Gem

















































Tuesdays 





September 26 - November 28





6:30-8:30PM










Marked by its succinctness and expressiveness, classical Chinese manifests fully the unique characteristic of the visceral language, which is an uncanny blending of music and painting.



Instructor: Ben Wang, Senior Lecturer of Language & Humanities at China Institute







Private Tutoring





The Private Tutoring Program was established to meet students' specific language needs. Classes are offered both in-person or online, and every lesson is customized to fulfill an individual's language goals across multiple work streams. Our instructors are all native speakers with excellent credentials. 




HSK Preparation


Chinese Proficiency Test (HSK), an international standardized test of Chinese language proficiency, assesses non-native Chinese speakers' abilities in using the Chinese language in their daily, academic and professional lives. With experienced instructors, effective curriculum and rich resources, we offer quality private tutoring in HSK test preparation to help you achieve the highest score possible!  




Crash Course for Corporate Executives - Chinese Culture & Business Etiquette



Designed for corporate professionals doing business with the Chinese, this crash course provides executives with a business focused overview of Chinese culture and language and will help participants interact more confidently, build rapport and strengthen relationships with potential business partners.


Summer Day Camp - 


Last chance to enroll before session III

Enroll for our third session fromAugust 7 - August 18 *Fridays are field trip days and meet from 9am-12pm


Make your child's summer a fun-filled experience by enrolling in the Children's Summer Day Camp at China Institute.








Chinese Language - Fall 2017 




Fall 2017 Classes begin the week ofSeptember 11th, 2017. We are accepting new students for the fall semester ages 2-17 and for all proficiency levels! 














Early bird discount! 
Sign up before August 14th to get the $50 registration fee waived. 5% discount for siblings.








Private Tutoring

Flexible Schedule, 


Location & Times

Private tutoring through China Institute offers a flexible alternative to regular language classes.




SAT & AP PREP

Flexible Schedule, 


Location & Times

China Institute delivers personally tailored Mandarin Chinese SAT & AP Prep lessons. 

educators 


Case Studies for Better Teaching
October 1, 7, 14; December 3, 2017
10:00AM-3:30PM




Case Studies for Better Teaching (CSBT), a short course designed and delivered by Dr. Wei-ling Wu, is intended to examine the question through case studies that focus on implementation and practice. The participants will discuss and analyze various lesson plans, activities, tasks, projects, and even worksheets in light of the ACTFL Standards and the ACTFL Core Practices to see what works and what needs improvement.


Immigration in a Changing World: Identity, Citizenship, and Belo
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 “珍陶萃美” —清宫陳設钧瓷賞析

University Teaching Gallery, Harvard Art Museums
The Harvard Art Museums hold the largest and finest collection in the West of a rare and strikingly beautiful type of ceramic ware used in the private quarters of the Forbidden City, the Chinese imperial palace in Beijing. These numbered Jun wares—so named because each is marked on its base with a single Chinese numeral—have long been admired for their fine potting, distinctive shapes, and radiant purple and blue glazes. Opinions on these vessels’ dates of origin vary widely, and given the scarcity of numbered Jun in most museum collections, a comprehensive study of this unusual ware has never been undertaken outside the imperial collections in China and Taiwan.
Drawn entirely from the museums’ permanent collections, this exhibition introduces the typology, technical characteristics, collecting history, and controversies surrounding numbered Jun ware. It features approximately half of the museums’ 60 numbered Jun, all of which were given to Harvard in 1942 by Boston-area collectors Ernest B. Dane (Harvard College Class of 1892) and his wife Helen Pratt Dane. This exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the Danes’ extraordinary gift of nearly 300 Chinese ceramics and later jades. It is also the first focused exhibition of their unique collection of palace Jun ware since it came to Harvard.
The exhibition is complemented by an online resource that provides further contextualization of Harvard’s entire numbered Jun collection. The Numbered Jun Ware Special Collection introduces this remarkable ceramic ware and explores its many complexities through descriptive summaries of its typology, technical characteristics, controversies, and collecting history, accompanied by a selection of representative images.
Curated by Melissa A. Moy, the Alan J. Dworsky Associate Curator of Chinese Art at the Harvard Art Museums.
The exhibition and online special collections feature are funded in part by the Gregory and Maria Henderson Fund and by generous support from Terry and William Carey.
Related Programming
Information about related events, including gallery talks in English and in Mandarin Chinese, can be found on our calendar.
Index magazine

Stories related to the exhibition can be found in the museums’ Index magazine. Click on the “exhibition” tag at magazine.harvardartmuseums.org.




















Gallery Talk (in Mandarin Chinese): Adorning the Inner Court: Jun Ware for the Chinese Palace


中文導覽: “珍陶萃美” —清宫陳設钧瓷賞析 2017年7月13日 主講: 楊妍 館員、研究員 哈佛大學藝術博物館5月20日至8月13日舉辦主題展覽Adorning the Inner Court: Jun Ware for the Chinese Palace。圍繞館藏的鈞瓷精品,討論清宮陳設類鈞瓷的工藝特點、製作方法及其歷史和藝術欣賞價值。歡迎參觀! 導覽憑門票參加。名額限於15人。請於導覽開始前十分鐘在售票處領取,並於售票處旁的電子顯示屏前集合。 Yan Yang, curatorial assistant for the collection in the Division of Asian and Mediterranean Art, will give today’s gallery talk. Adorning the Inner Court...
  • Hours: 12:30pm - 1:00pm
  • Date: July 13, 2017


















Works & Process, the Performing-Arts Series at the Guggenheim, Announces Fall 2017 Season



Highlights:

  • Works & Process Rotunda Project commission featuring American Ballet Theatre principal Daniil Simkin with costumes by Dior
  • A new commission featuring Ryan McNamara and John Zorn
  • A new commission by Nico Muhly inspired by the oldest song in the world
  • Previews of new operas by John Adams and Peter Sellars, and Thomas Adès and Tom Cairns
  • Performance and discussion celebrating the 50th anniversary of  Tanaquil Le Clercq’s The Ballet Cook Book with a dinner featuring recipes from the book.
  • Peter & The Wolf with Isaac Mizrahi
(NEW YORK, NY – July 31, 2017)—Works & Process at the Guggenheim is pleased to announce its fall 2017 season and opens the season with a commissioned performance made in and for the museum rotunda. Since 1984 the performing-arts series has championed new works and offered audiences unprecedented access to leading creators and performers. Each intimate, 80-minute performance combines artistic creation with stimulating conversation, and takes place in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed, 285-seat Peter B. Lewis Theater. The New York Times describes Works & Process as “a popular series devoted to shedding light on the creative process.” Additional information is available at worksandprocess.org.
Lead funding for Works & Process is provided by The Florence Gould Foundation, The Christian Humann Foundation, Mertz-Gilmore Foundation, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Caroline M. Sharp, and Evelyn Sharp Foundation, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

FALL 2017 SEASON SCHEDULE

WORKS & PROCESS ROTUNDA PROJECT

Falls the Shadow by Daniil Simkin

Monday and Tuesday, September 4 and 5, 8 and 9:30 pm
Commissioned by Works & Process and created by American Ballet Theatre (ABT) Principal Dancer Daniil Simkin, Falls the Shadow is a new production featuring Simkin, ABT soloist Cassandra Trenary, Ana Lopez from Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, and dancer Brett Conway; choreography by Alejandro Cerrudo; projection design by Dmitrij Simkin; and costume design by Dior. The performers’ movements will be captured by motion sensors, generating 3-D mapped visuals that will be projected onto the rotunda to create an immersive experience that merges technology, music, visual art, fashion, and dance. This 30-minute performance will be viewed from the ramps and requires audience members to stand for the duration of the program.
Leadership support for Works & Process Rotunda Projects provided by Mertz-Gilmore Foundation, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and Caroline M. Sharp.
Daniil Simkin: Falls the Shadow lead support provided by Kerry Clayton and Paige Royer; Howard Paley; and Michèle and Steven Pesner.
WorldStage is the technology partner for Danill Simkin: Falls the Shadow.

Nico Muhly and the Countertenor

Sunday, September 17, 7:30 pm
Composer Nico Muhly discusses his music for countertenor. A selection of these works will be performed alongside a preview of a new Works & Process commission. Inspired by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World’s interpretation of the oldest song in the world, the commission is an extension of Lenka Clayton and Jon Rubin’s project . . . circle through New York, part of the Guggenheim Social Practice initiative.

The Principles of Uncertainty by John Heginbotham and Maira Kalman

Monday, September 18, 7:30 pm
Choreographer John Heginbotham and author/illustrator Maira Kalman discuss their newest collaboration featuring imaginative production design and whimsical dance theater inspired by Kalman’s written work and visual art. Following the world premiere at Jacob’s Pillow Dance and before the New York premiere at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Dance Heginbotham and members of The Knights orchestra will perform highlights set to a score by the orchestra’s artistic director Colin Jacobsen.

San Francisco Opera: Girls of the Golden West by John Adams and Peter Sellars

Thursday and Friday, September 21 and 22, 7:30 pm
Composer John Adams and librettist/director Peter Sellars discuss their newest collaboration with San Francisco Opera General Director Matthew Shilvock. Sourced from historical writings about California’s Gold Rush, the opera explores the dramatic and brutal stories of remarkable characters who are hoping to strike it rich and are quickly caught up in the optimism, greed, and prejudices of a rapidly changing world. Highlights are performed prior to the world premiere in San Francisco.

Lincoln Center Theater: JUNK by Ayad Akhtar

Saturday, September 23, 7:30 pm
Pulitzer Prize–winning author Ayad Akhtar and Tony Award–winning director Doug Hughes discuss Akhtar’s newest play before its New York premiere. Cast members perform highlights from the financial thriller, set in the hotbed of the 1980s, about Robert Merkin, the genius behind an upstart investment firm hell-bent on changing all the rules. Merkin sets in motion a financial civil war, pitting magnates against workers, lawyers against journalists, and ultimately, everyone against themselves.

The Living Word Project: |peh-LO-tah| by Marc Bamuthi Joseph

Sunday, October 1, 7:30 pm
In conjunction with Joseph’s project moving and passing, part of the Guggenheim Social Practice initiative, highlights from /peh-LO-tah/ will be performed prior to opening at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Directed by Michael John Garcés, choreographed by Stacey Printz, and with music by Tommy Shepard, the work is a “futbol-framed freedom suite” inspired by Joseph’s first-generation American experience, and it explores the intersection of global economics, crossborder fan culture, and the politics of joy. Joseph will discuss the work with producer Cathy Zimmerman.

American Ballet Theatre Season Preview

Sunday and Monday, October 8 and 9, 7:30 pm
For over 75 years, ABT has been home to the most important figures in classical ballet. Join the company for an evening of discussion and dance as highlights of new commissions from the fall 2017 season are performed prior to their premieres.

The Metropolitan Opera: The Exterminating Angel

Music by Thomas Adès, libretto by Tom Cairns

Monday, October 16, 7:30 pm
Hailed by the New York Times at its 2016 Salzburg Festival premiere as “inventive and audacious. . . . a major event,” Thomas Adès’s The Exterminating Angel, inspired by the classic Luis Buñuel film of the same name, is a surreal fantasy about a dinner party that guests cannot escape. Prior to the American premiere, Met Opera general manager Peter Gelb discusses the opera with Adès, and singers perform highlights.

Open Rehearsal: Steve Reich and Ensemble Signal

Tuesday, October 17, 7:30 pm
Go into the rehearsal studio with conductor Brad Lubman and Ensemble Signal as they prepare for their Carnegie Hall concert featuring music by Steve Reich. Preview the New York premiere of Runner and hear Pulse in raw form, without technical equipment or sound reinforcement. Between performances, Reich and Lubman discuss the works.

NEW COMMISSION

Ryan McNamara and John Zorn

Sunday and Monday, October 22 and 23, 7:30 pm
See the premiere of a Works & Process commission for the unique architecture of the Guggenheim’s Peter B. Lewis Theater. Collaborating with a community of dancers and artists with whom he has worked for years, Ryan McNamara will create a performance set to Commedia dell’arte by composer John Zorn.

Tanaquil Le Clercq’s The Ballet Cook Book: A 50th Anniversary Celebration

Sunday and Monday, November 5 and 6, 7:30 pm
In 1967 ballerina Tanaquil Le Clercq published The Ballet Cook Book, her masterful compendium of ballet history, food stories, and recipes from over 90 leading dancers and choreographers of the day, including George Balanchine, Jacques d’Amboise, Melissa Hayden, and Allegra Kent. Celebrating the book’s 50th anniversary, dancers from New York City Ballet perform excerpts from roles originated by Ballet Cook Book contributors, and dance legends Jacques d’Amboise and Allegra Kent join food scholar Meryl Rosofsky and dancers Jared Angle and Adrian Danchig-Waring in a discussion of Le Clercq’s artistic and culinary legacy.
In conjunction with this program, select dishes from The Ballet Cook Book will be served at The Wright restaurant. For reservations call 212 427 5690 or visit opentable.com.

The Sarasota Ballet: Classical and New Voices

Sunday, November 19, 3 and 7:30 pm
American Ballet Theatre Principal Dancer and choreographer Marcelo Gomes, invited by director Iain Webb and executive director Joseph Volpe, recently performed with The Sarasota Ballet in Sir Frederick Ashton’s rarely seen The Two Pigeons. After working with Gomes, Webb commissioned a new choreographic work from him. Exploring classical and new voices, Gomes performs highlights from The Two Pigeons and company dancers perform excerpts from the new commission prior to the premiere in Sarasota. With Webb, Gomes shares insight into his creative process during the development of this new work.

Peter & the Wolf with Isaac Mizrahi

December 2, 3, 9, and 10, 2:30 and 4 pm
December 8, 6:30 pm
Isaac Mizrahi narrates Sergei Prokofiev’s charming children’s classic as Brad Lubman conducts Ensemble Signal and a cast performs choreography by John Heginbotham, bringing the 30-minute story to life for the young and young at heart.
For children 5 and up. Enter via the ramp at 88th St and 5th Ave.
FRONT ROW TICKETING: $100, $95 Friends of Works & Process and Guggenheim members

NEW COMMISSION

Holiday Concert

Sunday and Monday, December 17 and 18, 7 pm
Celebrate the season with the joyous sounds of holiday music and a new Works & Process commission by composer Nico Muhly in the museum’s iconic rotunda. George Steel conducts the Vox Vocal Ensemble in what has become a revered annual tradition.
FLOOR SEATING: $40, $35 Friends of Works & Process and Guggenheim members
RAMP STANDING: $20, $15 Friends of Works & Process and Guggenheim members

Location

Peter B. Lewis Theater (unless otherwise noted)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue at 89th Street
Subway: 4, 5, 6 train to 86th Street
Bus: M1, M2, M3, or M4 bus on Madison or Fifth Avenue

Tickets

$40, $35 members (unless otherwise noted)
$10 student rush tickets available one hour prior to each performance if space allows
(for students under 25 with valid ID).
Priority ticket access and preferred seat selection starts July 31, 2017, for Friends of Works & Process or Guggenheim members Associate level and above.
Season tickets will be on sale August 7. 2017.
For the box office call 212 423 3575, Mon–Fri, 1–5 pm.
For more information, call 212 758 0024 or 212 423 3587, Mon–Fri, 1–5 pm, or visit worksandprocess.org.

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The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Appoints Karole P.B. Vail to Lead the Peggy Guggenheim Collection

(NEW YORK AND VENICE – June 8, 2017) –– Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, today announced the appointment of Guggenheim curator Karole P.B. Vail as Director of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice and Foundation Director for Italy. A member of the Guggenheim’s curatorial staff since 1997 and a granddaughter of Peggy Guggenheim, Ms. Vail becomes only the second director in the history of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, succeeding Philip Rylands, who led the museum for 37 years and will become Director Emeritus. Ms. Vail will assume her duties in Venice this month, reporting to Richard Armstrong.
Ms. Vail’s most recent exhibition for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York was the highly regarded retrospective Moholy-Nagy: Future Present (2016), which she organized in collaboration with the Art Institute of Chicago and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. She is currently co-organizing the retrospective Alberto Giacometti, to be presented at the Guggenheim in New York in 2018.
Richard Armstrong said, “Having worked closely with Karole Vail for almost a decade, I have the deepest respect for her scholarship, curatorial insight, unfailingly sound judgment, and collegial management style. I have the utmost confidence in her ability to lead the Peggy Guggenheim Collection into the future, and know that her personal ties to the institution and roots in Italy and Europe will add an unmatched depth and nuance to her work.”
William L. Mack, Chairman of the Guggenheim Board of Trustees, said, “Karole Vail assumes leadership at an auspicious moment, when the Peggy Guggenheim Collection is enjoying record attendance and a strong exhibition program, and recently completed a successful capital campaign to support key renovation projects at the Palazzo. Karole’s appointment begins a special and exciting new chapter in the museum’s history.”
Karole Vail said, “I have known and loved Peggy’s collection, and the palazzo and garden that are its home, since I was a child. Now it is my privilege and honor to lead this exceptional institution, carrying forward Peggy’s vision and ensuring that it remains a vital part of today’s culture, as she would have wanted it to be. I embark on this role with a sense of great responsibility, an eye to the future and a deep appreciation for Peggy’s extraordinary accomplishments.”
About Karole P.B. Vail
Karole P.B. Vail, a curator at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and a member of its curatorial staff since 1997, will assume her duties as Director of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection and Foundation Director for Italy in Venice in June 2017.
Among the exhibitions at the Guggenheim Museum for which she has served as curator or co-curator, in addition to Moholy-Nagy: Future Present and Alberto Giacometti, are Peggy Guggenheim: A Centennial Celebration (1998); Art of Tomorrow: Hilla Rebay and Solomon R. Guggenheim (2005-06); and From Berlin to New York: Karl Nierendorf and the Guggenheim (2008).
Ms. Vail has also been a collaborator and coordinator for Surrealism: Two Private Eyes, The Nesuhi Ertegun and Daniel Filipacchi Collections (1999); Armani (2000); Boccioni’s Materia: A Futurist Masterpiece and the Avant-Garde in Milan and Paris (2004); Robert Mapplethorpe and the Classical Tradition: Photographs and Mannerist Prints (2004); Lucio Fontana: Venice/New York (2006); Solomon’s Gift: The Foundation Collection of the Guggenheim, 1937-1949 (2007); Richard Pousette-Dart (2008); Kandinsky (2009), in conjunction with which she also organized the photography exhibition Kandinsky and Gabriele Münter in the Guggenheim’s Sackler Center for Education; Picasso Black and White (2013); and Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian: Infinite Possibility, Mirror Works and Drawings 1974-2014 (2014-15).
Among the many publications that Ms. Vail has written, co-written or edited are The Museum of Non-Objective Painting: Hilla Rebay and the Origins of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, conceived of by Ms. Vail and published in 2009 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum; Moholy-Nagy: Future Present, which received an Honorable Mention in the 2017 Awards for Excellence of the Association of Art Museum Curators; Art of Tomorrow: Hilla Rebay and Solomon R. Guggenheim; and Peggy Guggenheim: A Celebration. Ms. Vail has also contributed texts and entries to catalogues such as Kandinsky, Armani and Surrealism: Two Private Eyes, The Nesuhi Ertegun and Daniel Filipacchi Collections.
She is a co-founder and co-director of Non-Objectif Sud, a not-for-profit artist residency and exhibition program in the south of France.
Prior to joining the Guggenheim, Ms. Vail served as an archivist and researcher at Centro Di in Florence, Italy, a documentation center and publishing house specializing in art history, architecture and decorative arts, and as an assistant curator on independent projects. Educated in the U.K., she received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Durham University and a Diploma in Art History from the New Academy for Art Studies in London.

Guggenheim Celebrates 150th Birthday of Frank Lloyd Wright on Thursday, June 8 with Special Open Hours, On-Site Activities, and $1.50 Admission

Additional programs throughout June will honor the legacy of Wright, architect of the iconic Guggenheim Museum


Event: Frank Lloyd Wright 150th Birthday Celebration
Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Date: June 8, 10 am–5:45 pm
Website: www.guggenheim.org/flw150
(NEW YORK, NY—May 3, 2017)—Celebrate the 150th birthday of Frank Lloyd Wright through a series of activities at the architect’s masterwork: the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
The celebration kicks off Thursday, June 8 with a special open day (10 am to 5:45 pm) and a reduced admission fee of $1.50 in honor of Wright’s 150th birthday. The Guggenheim’s newly renovated Cafe 3 will feature large-scale, rarely seen photographs of the museum during its construction and will add a special birthday cupcake to the day’s menu. An actor-historian portraying Frank Lloyd Wright will be on-site engaging with visitors between 10 am and 1 pm.
Additional activities will be offered during the month of June including architecture-specific tours of the museum as part of the Art in the Round program, sketch workshops such as Drawing the Guggenheim, and a variety of family programs. The Guggenheim Store will also feature new Wright-related merchandise, and the museum’s website will highlight new content about Wright.
To view a full schedule of Frank Lloyd Wright-related events at the Guggenheim this June, visit guggenheim.org/flw150.

JUNE 8 ACTIVITIES


10:30 am and 11 am: Fifteen-minute overview of the design and construction of the Guggenheim Museum in Cafe 3, led by an actor-historian portraying Frank Lloyd Wright
11:30 am–12:30 pm: Actor-historian portraying Frank Lloyd Wright greets museum visitors at the Fifth Avenue entrance
12-1 pm: Architectural tour of the museum led by Ashley Mendelsohn, Curatorial Assistant, Architecture and Digital Initiatives, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1 pm: Birthday cake and candles in Cafe 3
Interview, photo, and b-roll opportunities available.

ABOUT THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION


Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.
GUGGENHEIM LATIN AMERICAN CIRCLE PRESENTS PERFORMANCES ON MAY 5 First Public Presentation in the United States of Three Recently Acquired Artworks by OPAVIVIRÁ!, Amalia Pica, and Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa

 (NEW YORK, NY – April 25, 2017) –– On Friday, May 5, the Guggenheim Museum introduces three recently acquired artworks performed for the first time in the United States by Rio de Janeiro-based collective OPAVIVARÁ!, Amalia Pica (b. 1978, Neuquén, Argentina), and Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa (b.1978, Guatemala City). The evening marks the first public event organized by the museum’s recently formed Latin American Circle, a group of art patrons and collectors dedicated to raising awareness and support for museum public programs, acquisitions, and exhibitions, with a focus on contemporary Latin American art. Latin American Circle Presents: An Evening of Performance is organized by curator Pablo León de la Barra with Amara Antilla, Assistant Curator. Furthering its mission of collecting, preserving, and interpreting the art of our time in a global context, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation has presented several exhibitions of Latin American art in recent years, including Doris Salcedo (2015) and Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms (2012–13), and produced Sanatorium by Pedro Reyes (2012). Through the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, a distinctive program that creates direct access to contemporary art and education on a global scale via in-depth collaboration with artists, curators, and cultural organizations from three regions including Latin America, the Guggenheim increased its holdings of Latin American art by twenty percent and appointed Pablo León de la Barra as Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Latin America. Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today (2014–16), presented in New York, Mexico City, and London as part of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Initiative, featured more than fifty new works added to the collection. Since the 1960s, the Guggenheim Museum has presented numerous performances in the rotunda by artists including Marina Abramović, Philip Glass, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Pierre Huyghe, Joan Jonas, Meredith Monk, and John Zorn as well as performance-based exhibitions and installations by Matthew Barney and Tino Sehgal. Recognizing performance and time-based media as an essential aspect of art practice, and the issues it raises—regarding duration and ephemerality, the role of the document and the function of memory, the value of labor and the significance of personal interaction— the Guggenheim remains committed to the process of acquiring, maintaining and displaying ephemeral, durational works of art. Latin American Circle Presents: An Evening of Performance at the Guggenheim May 5, 7–9 pm On May 5, three performance works will be presented in the museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright rotunda. Amalia Pica’s Asamble (2015) takes the form of a procession involving more than two dozen participants—the circular form of which evokes a universal emblem of assembly—and explores the challenges of democratic communication. Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa’s A Brief History of Architecture in Guatemala (Breve Historia de la Arquitectura en Guatemala, 2010) is a dance performed in costumes modeled after iconic Mesoamerican building typologies—a Mayan pyramid, a colonial church, a modernist block—and examines the tendency of architecture to memorialize regimes of power and exploitation. In Kitchen Drumming (Batuque na cozinha, 2013/17) by OPAVIVARÁ!, basic kitchen tools mounted to the body become percussive instruments in a performance that fuses celebration and protest by evoking carnival parades, marching bands, and anti-government demonstrations. A reception and private view of the current exhibitions Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim and The Hugo Boss Prize 2016: Anicka Yi, Life is Cheap will follow. Tickets are $15, $10 for members, and $8 for students and can be purchased by calling the Box Office at 212 423 3587 or visiting guggenheim.org/publicprograms. Support for the performance is provided by Guggenheim Latin American Circle members Ximena Caminos and Alan Faena, Catherine Petitgas, and Camila Sol de Pool. About the Artists Founded in 2005 in Rio de Janeiro, OPAVIVARÁ! is an artist collective comprised of four members, who all received BFA degrees from the Parque Lage School of Visual Arts, Rio de Janeiro. The collective has participated in group exhibitions including Ecologica, Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo (2010); O Abrigo e o Torreno, Museu de Arte do Rio (2013); Acción Urgente, Fundación Proa, Buenos Aires; the Taipei Biennial (both 2014); Havana Biennial; The City Is Ours, the Body Is Mine: Urban Spatial Practices in Contemporary Latin America, James Gallery, The Graduate Center, City University of New York (both 2015); the São Paulo Biennial; Projeto Brasil/The Sky Is Already Falling, Hebbel am Ufer, Berlin; Transnomaden, Künstlerhaus, Frankfurt (all 2016). All the members of OPAVIVARÁ! live and work in Rio de Janeiro. Amalia Pica was born in 1978 in Neuquén, Argentina. She moved to Buenos Aires to study at Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes P. Pueyrredón, completing her undergraduate degree in 2001. Pica has had solo exhibitions at Malmö Konsthall, Sweden (2010); University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor (2011); Modern Art Oxford; Chisenhale Gallery, London; and Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, Switzerland (all 2012); and MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City, and Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Neuquén, Argentina (all 2013); Van Abbemuseum, the Netherlands (2014); and Kunstverein Freiburg, Germany (2016). She has participated in group exhibitions including the Venice Biennale (2011, 2015); The Ungovernables: New Museum Triennial, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2012); Adventures of the Black Square, Whitechapel Gallery, London; Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (both 2015); and Gwangju Biennial, South Korea (2016). Pica received the Paul Hamlyn Foundation Award in 2011. She lives and works in London. Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa was born in 1978 in Guatemala City, receiving a BFA in Media Arts from Emily Carr University, Vancouver, in 2006, and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2008. He was a postgraduate researcher at Jan Van Eyck Academie, Maastricht, the Netherlands, in 2013. Ramírez-Figueroa has had solo exhibitions at Casa de América, Madrid (2011), Akademie Schloss Solitude, Stuttgart (2011), and Gasworks, London (2015). He has participated in group exhibitions including A History of Interventions, Tate Modern, London; Gwangju Biennial, South Korea (both 2014); The School of Nature and Principle, EFA Project Space, New York; BMW Tate Live: Performance Room, Tate Modern, London (all 2015); São Paulo Biennial (both 2016); and Venice Biennale (2017). He is the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship (2012), a DAAD fellowship (2015–16) and the 2017 Mies van der Rohe Award. Ramirez-Figueroa lives and works in Berlin and Guatemala City. About the Latin American Circle Formed in 2016, the Latin American Circle, co-chaired by Clarissa Bronfman and Rudy Weissenberg, is a dynamic group of art collectors actively involved in contemporary art and culture in Latin America. Dedicated to advising on and advocating for the Guggenheim’s Latin American contemporary art initiatives, the group works closely with curator Pablo León de la Barra to facilitate the museum’s ongoing efforts to diversify and strengthen its programming and collection through both emerging and established artists from Latin America. About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org. 

Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority Celebrates the Opening of The Creative Act: Performance, Process, Presence, Second Exhibition from The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Collection

ABU DHABI, March 7, 2017)Under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Mohamed Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi) celebrated today the opening of The Creative Act: Performance, Process, Presence at Manarat Al Saadiyat on Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi. Featuring works by more than 25 artists from different nationalities and generations, the exhibition explores the related themes of performance, process, and presence through a variety of mediums. Running until 29 July 2017, The Creative Act is the second major exhibition of works from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection.
HE Saif Saeed Ghobash, Director General of TCA Abu Dhabi, commented on the exhibition “The Creative Act offers a transcultural perspective on defining aspects of contemporary art by highlighting interconnections among artists working in various corners of the world since the 1960s. The works in the exhibition reveal common sources of inspiration, lines of influence, and distinctive contributions. Two commissions featured in the exhibition reflect the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi’s commitment to supporting the production of new work by living artists. This exhibition marks not only the next defining step for the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, but also the establishment of the future museum’s role to encourage, inspire, and inform. Only through direct interaction with artworks, themes, creative professionals, and artists can we provide future generations with a fully rounded set of tools through which to understand the development of artistic expression.”
Three distinct yet interconnected themes of the exhibition—performance, process, and presence—provide a unifying framework for the exhibition, with many artists exploring more than one theme in the works on view:
Performance can be represented in several different forms: unfolding live in a given time and place, remaining afterward as recordings and documentations, or serving primarily as the means for creating discrete objects. The Creative Act features examples of live actions that constitute works in and of themselves and performative practices that result in drawings, paintings, sculptures, and videos. A selection of photographs document the renowned Emirati artist Hassan Sharif’s 1980s performances, which he realised in both London and Dubai. His conceptual, experimental, and performative practice greatly influenced the subsequent generation of artists in the United Arab Emirates, such as Mohammed Kazem, who is also featured in The Creative Act.
Many of the artworks offer insight into the process used to make them. A key work within this section is Anish Kapoor’s My Red Homeland (2003), a monumental sculptural installation composed of nearly twenty-five tonnes of red wax with a mechanical arm that circumnavigates the platform, continually altering the surface as it moves across the material. Works by pioneering 1960s experimental art practitioners including Rasheed AraeenJulio Le ParcNiki de Saint PhalleJean TinguelyGünther Uecker, and Jacques Villeglé, explore the process of creating with everyday materials and using performative techniques.
The theme of human presence is highlighted through artworks that involve the appearance of the artist or others in the works as well as visible traces of the physical acts undertaken to realize them. Paintings by artists affiliated with the Gutai Art Association (1954–72) including Motonaga SadamasaShiraga Kazuo, and Tanaka Atsuko epitomize these ideas. Video installations by Susan Hefuna and Anri Sala take the performing arts—dance and music respectively—and the theme of interpretation as points of departure. Autobiography (03-07) (2007), a series of forty photographs and a video, captures Emirati artist Ebtisam Abdulaziz’s performances in various public spaces in Sharjah and examines the often complex relationship between social and personal identities.
The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence is curated by Valerie Hillings, Ph.D., Curator and Manager, Curatorial Affairs, Abu Dhabi Project; Sasha Kalter-Wasserman, Assistant Curator, Abu Dhabi Project; with Sarah Dwider, Curatorial Assistant, Abu Dhabi Project, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; and Maisa Al Qassimi, Head of Programmes – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, with Muneera Al Sayegh, Programmes Officer – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority.
Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, commented: “The Creative Act brings into focus the complexity, poetry, and power of the human spirit. The exhibition also reflects our shared understanding of the vital necessity of global exchange that is at the heart of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi project. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is proud to be working with Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority to realize this exhibition that celebrates the considerable scholarship underpinning the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection and the catalytic potential of the future museum as a vital addition to the cultural landscape of the region and the world.”
In line with the commitment of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi to support original work by living artists, TCA Abu Dhabi has commissioned artists Hesam RahmanianRamin Haerizadeh, and Rokni Haerizadeh to create an installation inspired by the core themes of The Creative ActAnother Happy Day (2016–17) is a multiroom, immersive installation featuring artworks by the commissioned artists and others, which, like the selections from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection, probe the nature of the creative artistic process while inviting visitors to become engaged and activated. This project, coupled with photographs by Tarek Al-Ghoussein, part of a series commissioned by TCA Abu Dhabi for the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection, offers a convergence of past, present, and future in our own time.
The Creative Act: Performance, Process, Presence is curated by Valerie Hillings, Curator and Manager of Curatorial Affairs, Sasha Kalter-Wasserman, Assistant Curator, with Sara Dwider, Curatorial Assistant, Abu Dhabi Project, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; and Maisa Al Qassimi, Programmes Manager – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, with Muneera Al Sayegh, Programmes Officer – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority.
About Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi)
Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority conserves and promotes the heritage and culture of Abu Dhabi emirate and leverages them in the development of a world-class, sustainable destination of distinction, which enriches the lives of visitors and residents alike. The authority manages the emirate’s tourism sector and markets the destination internationally through a wide range of activities aimed at attracting visitors and investment. Its policies, plans and programmes relate to the preservation of heritage and culture, including protecting archaeological and historical sites and to developing museums, including the Louvre Abu Dhabi, Zayed National Museum and Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. TCA Abu Dhabi supports intellectual and artistic activities and cultural events to nurture a rich cultural environment and honour the emirate’s heritage. A key authority role is to create synergy in the destination’s development through close co-ordination with its wide-ranging stakeholder base. http://tcaabudhabi.ae/en
About Guggenheim Abu Dhabi
The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi museum will promote the understanding and appreciation of contemporary art, architecture, and other manifestations of modern and contemporary visual culture from an international perspective. A curatorial programme with a transcultural perspective on art and visual culture from the 1960s to the present will have a strong focus on art from West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia, exploring the specific identity derived from the cultural traditions of Abu Dhabi and the United Arab Emirates. The future museum, and its growing collection, is owned by the Government of Abu Dhabi. Surrounded almost entirely by water, Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will have spectacular views of the Saadiyat Cultural District and the Arabian Gulf. Galleries, many unprecedented in scale, are distributed around the central atrium on four levels connected by glass bridges above. Open to the elements, the museum cones housing contemporary art commissions, recall the region’s ancient wind-towers, which both ventilate and shade the exterior courtyards in a fitting blend of Arabian tradition and modern design. The museum will also feature a 350-seat theatre, education workshops and classrooms, an onsite conservation lab, as well as a retail store, cafes, and a restaurant.
The museum will be a catalyst for scholarship in a variety of fields, chief among them the history of art from West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia in the 20th and 21st centuries. A dynamic programme of changing exhibitions will explore common themes and affinities among the work of artists across time and geography. An ambitious programme of commissions created for the collection and exceptional spaces of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will reinforce the museum’s commitment to working with artists and the art of our time.
Guggenheim Abu Dhabi is being developed in collaboration with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim FoundationFounded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Appoints Nancy Spector to the New Post of Artistic Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator



Expanded Role Includes Leadership of Collections, Exhibitions, and Curatorial Programs at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City and All Guggenheim Museums Internationally

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NEW YORK, NY—(February 15, 2017) — Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, today announced that Nancy Spector has been appointed to serve as the institution’s first Artistic Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator, providing conceptual and strategic leadership of collections, exhibitions, and curatorial programs at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum on Fifth Avenue in New York and at all Guggenheim museums internationally. Through the new position of Artistic Director and Chief Curator, the Guggenheim will unify and strengthen artistic activities throughout its international constellation of museums and initiatives, both existing and in development, while accommodating the particular collections, initiatives, and audiences of each.
Nancy Spector previously served at the Guggenheim for more than 29 years, most recently in the role of Deputy Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator. She joined the Brooklyn Museum in April 2016 as Deputy Director and Chief Curator. As Artistic Director and Chief Curator of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, she will report directly to Richard Armstrong.
Richard Armstrong said, “Over the past year, we have given fresh thought to the way the Guggenheim creates and manages its artistic program in New York and abroad. This exploration has identified the need for an individual who provides leadership and strategic vision for collections, exhibitions and programs across all aspects of the Foundation and all the museums in our international constellation. During her many years at the Guggenheim, Nancy Spector shaped our institution in singular and significant ways. She is the ideal person to take on this new role working with the Guggenheim to realize and reimagine the radical purpose its founders gave it 80 years ago. We are pleased to welcome her into her new role.”
Nancy Spector said, “I’m grateful to Anne Pasternak, the Trustees and the wonderful staff of the Brooklyn Museum for giving me the opportunity to work with them and learn from them in their great institution. It has been a privilege to participate in the museum’s vital engagement with its community and to address the possibilities of its encyclopedic collection. But when Richard Armstrong approached me with the new position of Artistic Director at the Guggenheim, I simply could not let this extraordinary opportunity—which is truly unique to the Guggenheim—pass me by. I look forward to working with my Guggenheim colleagues in New York and around the world in envisioning the many innovative programs and initiatives we will create together in the coming years.”
Anne Pasternak, the Shelby White and Leon Levy Director of the Brooklyn Museum, added, “We are truly grateful to Nancy for the wisdom and leadership she contributed during her tenure here at the Brooklyn Museum. From her thoughtful strategic planning contributions to reenergizing our curatorial department, exhibiting more of our historic collections, working on curatorial collaborations and prestigious partnerships, and boosting our public programs. Her time here has been a time of real action. We will build on these foundations and look forward to collaborating with Nancy in the future. We wish her all the best in this great new international adventure.”

About Nancy Spector

Nancy Spector received her Masters Degree in Art History from the Clark Art Institute at Williams College and her MPhil from City University Graduate Center in New York after graduating from Sarah Lawrence College. During more than 29 years at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, including 10 years as Deputy Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator, she organized exhibitions on conceptual photography, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Matthew Barney’s Cremaster cycle, Richard Prince, Louise Bourgeois (with Tate Modern), Marina Abramovic, Tino Sehgal, Maurizio Cattelan and Peter Fischli/David Weiss. She also organized the group exhibitions Moving PicturesSingular Forms (Sometimes Repeated); and theanyspacewhatever. She was Adjunct Curator of the 1997 Venice Biennale and co-organizer of the first Berlin Biennial in 1998. Under the auspices of the Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin, she initiated special commissions by Andreas Slominski, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Lawrence Weiner, and Gabriel Orozco, as well as a special exhibition on the work of Joseph Beuys and Matthew Barney.
She has contributed to numerous books on contemporary visual culture with essays on artists such as Maurizio Cattelan, Luc Tuymans, Roni Horn, Janine Antoni, Douglas Gordon, Tino Seghal, and Mona Hatoum. In 2007 she was the U.S. Commissioner for the Venice Biennale, where she presented an exhibition of work by Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Spector is a recipient of the Peter Norton Family Foundation Curators Award, five International Art Critics Association Awards, and a Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Award for her work on Youtube Play, a Biennial of Creative Video. In 2014, she was included in the 40 Women Over 40 to Watch list. At the Brooklyn Museum, where she worked for as Deputy Director and Curator from 2016-17, she reorganized the curatorial staff structure, launched the 10-exhibition program Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism, and spearheaded the cross-collection, long-term exhibition Infinite Blue

About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum & Foundation

Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.
ZhouTao_InstallationViewTalesOfOurTime
SPRING 2017 PUBLIC PROGRAMS AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM
The Sackler Center for Arts Education at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents the following public programs and film series in conjunction with the exhibitions Tales of Our Time and Visionaries: Creating a Modern GuggenheimMORE >
Tales of Our Time Programs
Gallery Reading: Ken Liu
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 12 PM 
Author Ken Liu (The Grace of Kings and The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories) reads from his commissioned short story in the Tales of Our Time exhibition catalogue and other texts inspired by works on view.

Free with museum admission. Limited capacity. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Film Premiere and Director Q&A: The Swim, directed by He Xiangyu
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1 PM
The Guggenheim hosts the U.S. premiere of The Swim, an art film with documentary characteristics. To create the film, artist He Xiangyu returned three times to his hometown in Kuandian—a poor county located by the Yalu River on the China–North Korea border. Through interviews with Korean War veterans, defectors from North Korea, and their families, The Swim unveils the cruel reality hidden behind the beautiful scenery of Kuandian and presents the utopian fantasy projected on individuals. The event concludes with a Q&A with He Xiangyu and Xiaoyu Weng, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art.

Free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/filmscreenings.
Hypnotic Show
TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 7 AND 9:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 7 AND 9:30 PM
An exhibition that takes place in the mind—individual and collective—this intimate experiment in cognitive exhibition making through art and hypnosis was conceived by Raimundas Malašauskas and Marcos Lutyens. It explores how the image and concept of place can be depicted through alternative modes of narrative and serves as an imaginary ending to the exhibition.

$18, $15 members, $10 students. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Unwritten Rules Cannot Be Broken: Tea Gatherings
WEDNESDAYS, THROUGH MARCH 8, 1:30–5:45 PM
Since 2002 Yangjiang Group has been inviting neighbors in Yangjiang, its small hometown on the southern coast of China, to drink tea, play soccer, practice calligraphy, and enjoy communal dinners. As part of Unwritten Rules Cannot Be Broken, their newly commissioned work for Tales of Our Time, visitors are invited to converse and contemplate calligraphy over a cup of tea prepared and served by local tea brewers. Visitors are also encouraged to measure their blood pressure and heart rate before and after experiencing this installation—a humorous ploy designed to calculate the purported relaxing effects of a tea gathering.

Free with museum admission. No RSVP is required. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Tales of Our Time Tours in Mandarin
SATURDAYS, 12–1 PM
Join a conversational tour of Tales of Our Time in Mandarin facilitated by an educator trained in art history and gallery teaching.

Free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Tales of Our Time Film Program
FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS, THROUGH FEBRUARY 25, 1 PM
These documentary and narrative films explore topics shared with the exhibition, investigating concepts such as boundaries, territory, migration, and place. Screenings take place in the New Media Theater, Lower Level, and are free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/filmscreenings

February 3–4Traces of an Invisible City, directed by Bo Wang and Pan Lu; The Wangs, directed by Bo Wang (Both screenings include a Q&A session with the director.)
February 10–11Life after Life, directed by Zhang Hanyi
February 17–18Terra Nullius or: How to Be a Nationalist, directed by James T. Hong (Both screenings include a Q&A session with the director.)
February 24–25The Swim, directed by He Xiangyu (February 25 screening includes a Q&A session with the director.)
Visionaries Programs
Long-Look Wednesdays
WEDNESDAYS, FEBRUARY–AUGUST 
Each Wednesday during the run of Visionaries, museum visitors have the opportunity to explore the Guggenheim collection, including one-hour focused experiences with a single work, in specialist-led learning experiences.

One Hour, One Object Tours
WEDNESDAYS, 2 PM Join a museum educator trained in art, art history, and gallery teaching to spend an hour focusing in detail on one work of art through conversation and close looking.

Collection in Focus
SELECT WEDNESDAYS, 12 PM Join a curator and conservator in the galleries for an in-depth discussion of topics including new historical research and scientific conservation studies/analyses. Limited capacity.

Curator’s Eye Tour of Visionaries
APRIL 12, 12 PM Megan Fontanella, Curator, Collections and Provenance, and curator of Visionaries, leads a tour of the exhibition.
Free with museum admission. Some events have limited capacity. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar. 
Eye to Eye: Artist-Led Tours
TUESDAYS, APRIL 11 AND MAY 23, 6:30 PM
Guggenheim collection artists lead intimate after-hours tours through Visionaries, offering their unique perspectives on the works and  reflections on such topics as abstraction, mediums, and materials. Each program includes a reception in the Guggenheim rotunda.

April 11: Lucy Dodd
May 23: Julia Dault

$25, $20 members, $12 students. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar
Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict
FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS, MARCH 3–25, 1 PM
On the occasion of Women’s History Month, the Guggenheim hosts weekly screenings of Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict, directed by Lisa Immordino Vreeland. The film focuses on a key figure in the Guggenheim’s institutional history as she moved through the cultural upheaval of the 20th century to build one of the most important collections of modern art today.

Screenings take place in the New Media Theater, Lower Level, and are free with admission. For the full schedule, visit guggenheim.org/filmscreenings.
Seventh Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture
John Giorno and Ugo Rondinone
APRIL 25, 6:30 PM 
Poet John Giorno and artist Ugo Rondinone met at a reading in 1997 and have since become life partners and each other’s muses. For the Seventh Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture, Giorno and Rondinone discuss and reflect on their respective creative practices  in a conversation moderated by Laura Hoptman, Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, Museum of Modern Art. The program concludes with a reception in the Guggenheim’s iconic rotunda.
Free with RSVP. To RSVP or for more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

This series is facilitated by the donors to the Robert Rosenblum Fund who are greatly acknowledged for their generosity.
Mind’s Eye Tours
SELECT MONDAYS, 6:30 PM, AND SELECT WEDNESDAYS, 2 PM 
For visitors who are blind or have low vision, these tours and workshops are presented through verbal description, conversation, sensory experiences, and creative practice. Free, RSVP required. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/mindseye.

Monday, February 13: Love and Art
Wednesday, March 8: Visionaries
Monday, April 3: Guggenheim Collection: Focus on Brancusi
Art After Dark
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 9 PM–MIDNIGHT; EXCLUSIVE MEMBERS' HOUR: 8–9 PM 
An after-hours private viewing of current exhibitions, including Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim and Tales of Our Time, featuring a cash bar and live musical entertainment.

Free for members, $25 general admission. Purchase tickets online in advance or become a member. Cash bar serves wine and beer. Guests will be asked for a photo ID. Limited general admission tickets will go on sale closer to the event date. No tickets are sold at the door.


 China Institute
  Renwen Society

Symposium on Liu Haisu,    

Pioneer of Modern Chinese Art

Sunday, December 42:00-4:00pm

Speakers: Ms. Liu Chan, Mr. Chen Lusheng, Ms. Zhang Anna
Event fee: FREE
40 Rector Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10006




Liu Haisu was a prominent twentieth-century Chinese painter and a noted art educator. He excelled at combining traditional Chinese painting methods with European techniques, especially those of van Gogh and Cézanne, and promoted this style as a model for revolutionizing art education in China. As the leader of art schools in Shanghai and Nanjing, Liu exerted extraordinary influence. The scion of a distinguished literary family, Liu studied calligraphy under Kang Youwei and traditional landscape and flower painting under Wu Changshi and Chen Hengke. He became one of the founders of the Shanghai Academy, the first art college in modern China. During the 1920s and '30s he organized several important national and international exhibitions and toured Japan and Europe, where he studied Western techniques and exhibited his own works. As a teacher, Liu maintained that painters should combine a knowledge of formal art theory with their natural talent and personal judgment, a departure from the Chinese tradition of copying the compositions and techniques of old masters. His works in traditional Chinese style were free-flowing and brilliant in color.  

To commemorate the 120th anniversary of his birth, The Renwen Society presents a special symposium on the art legend on Sunday, December 42-4 pmSpeakers include: 
Ms. Liu Chan, daughter of Liu Haisu, Guest Professor at Nanjing University of the Arts, Honorary President of the Liu Haisu Gallery in Changzhou 
Mr. Chen Lusheng, Former Vice President of the National Museum of China 
Ms. Zhang Anna, President of Changzhou Liu Haisu-Xiayiqiao Art Museum

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